By joining a QUT research project, you can help us to discover new knowledge, create innovations and develop solutions for real-world challenges. Find a project below.

Displaying 1 - 12 of 27 Research participation opportunities

Empathic Accuracy – Observer Ratings and Feedback

Mental health professionals or trainee mental health professionals are needed to view video recordings selected as part of an Empathic Accuracy Dataset to investigate how empathic accuracy in mental health professionals compares to that of non-professionals, and how clinical experience may affect differences in empathic accuracy.

Study area
Faculty of Health

Responsible innovation in technology for children (RITEC) research project

We are seeking children aged 7-13 years with experience playing videogames to help us understand and optimise the impact of videogames on the wellbeing of children. Children and the parent/guardian will be required to attend two visits - one at the Children's Technology Centre, located at the QUT Kelvin Grove campus in Brisbane and one online. In visit one, children will play videogames while we record several types of data (such as heart rate, eye gaze, voice) that will help us understand their experience. In visit two, we will show children their data and ask them questions to help us interpret it. Participants will receive a $40 gift voucher at the end of visit one and a $30 gift voucher at the end of visit two. This project is being conducted in partnership with the LEGO Group and UNICEF.

Study area
Faculty of Science

Understanding young women’s willingness to seek sexual health-related social support from social media

This project involves a 15 minute online survey examining the factors that predict young women’s willingness to seek sexual health-related informational and emotional support from Facebook groups and social media influencers.

Study area
Faculty of Health

The influence of giving and receiving social support, a sense of community and other resources on well-being: a case study of the 2022 Brisbane floods

The purpose of this research project is to explore the relationships between individual resources such as resilience, interpersonal resources such as social support, and community resources such as sense of community on the psychological well-being of residents from flood-affected suburbs in Brisbane who had either given or received support during this time. This research is the first to bring all these factors together to develop a model of well-being during a stressful community event such as the recent floods, and hence will make an important contribution to both the psychological and natural disaster literature.

Study area
Faculty of Health

Use of driver support technology: understanding a new risky behaviour

Vehicles are being transformed with new Driver Support Technologies (DSTs) to improve safety and efficiency, however there is little research surrounding the misuse of these technologies. To address this gap in the literature, the purpose of this project is to develop and test a new model of risky driving behaviour that incorporates misuse of Driver Support Technology.

Study area
Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety–Queensland (CARRS-Q)

Experiences in the heat with Parkinson’s Disease

The findings will help to shed light on the experience of heat sensitivity in people with Parkinson’s disease and provide a tool for clinicians and researchers to assess heat sensitivity in people with Parkinson’s disease.

Study area
Faculty of Health

Mind and body performance patch

Current wearable health sensors are unable to monitor more than one marker at a time. This study aims to develop a multi-function “performance patch” by combining advanced materials and engineering with state-of-the-art biomedical, cognitive and exercise physiology sciences. To develop a performance patch, we need robust indicators of performance under different stressors such as environmental heat, muscle strain, psychosocial stress (e.g., giving a speech), and a lack of sleep. While four trials will be conducted to identify key biomarkers of performance and recovery, this information sheet provides specific details of the Heat Stress Trial. Biomarkers measured during this trial may ultimately be integrated into a performance patch that enables real-time monitoring of health and performance.

Study area
Faculty of Health

How smartphone cameras are impacting contemporary Western visual culture and literacy

The purpose of this research is to better understand what Australians photograph with their mobile technology, such as smartphones or tablets, and what the results reveal about how people make meaning, organize their experience, and understand the world.

Study area
Faculty of Creative Industries, Education and Social Justice

Examining methods to support self-guided attentional bias modification for alcohol consumption

The purpose of this project is to determine whether a novel psychological program, completed on a computer twice a week for 4 consecutive weeks, can improve health outcomes for young adults seeking to reduce their alcohol consumption.

Study area
Faculty of Health

Designing behaviour change programs for selfie use to improve women’s wellbeing - classifying photos as either conservative or provocative.

This project will involve completing a 5 minute survey where images will be ranked (on a scale of 1-10) on how provocative the photo is. This will be done for a series of images. These images will represent different personas of women, to ultimately understand how they apply and utilise Instagram filters.

Study area
Faculty of Business and Law

Metaemotions mediating the relationship between childhood trauma and disordered eating

The purpose of this research project is to explore how a person’s early life experiences impact their emotional reactions about their own emotions (metaemotions) and how this influences their eating behaviours.

Study area
Faculty of Health

Do you want to build a machine? Individual willingness to participate in data stewardship and consequential acceptance of AI

This study contributes to the literature by creating and testing an extended TAM that includes elements of PDS that may be used by potential stakeholders (e.g., developers and policymakers) to aid research and development of AI products and systems as well as PDS policies. Applying an eTAM is important to understand what the role of contribution and incentivisation of personal data plays in the overall acceptance of AI devices. Better data, via the contribution of everyday users’ information, results in better-trained systems which are able to create more equitable opportunities and outcomes for end-users. Understanding users’ motivations also allow for the design of effective behavioural interventions.

Study area
Faculty of Health

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