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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Engagement Strategy

Project code: PHSW02 Area of Research: Health Services Project aims and objectives: As part of the Faculty of Health Corporate Review, a prospectus is being developed outlining the processes of effective and appropriate culturally safe community engagement for researchers. This VRES project continues on from the 2019 VRES whereby a community engagement prospectus was started. Project methodology and resources: Some reviewing of literature and continued development of a prospectus. Location of research: Work from home. Prior knowledge/skills: Previous experience with …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Public Health and Social Work

Understanding the role of the hSSB1 protein in the response to UV induced DNA damage

Melanoma is the 4th most common cancer in Australia. The link between skin cancer and UV exposure is now well established. If a DNA damage induced by UV exposure is left unrepaired, the mutation generated in the genome can lead to cell death or cancer. It is thus highly important to understand of how a cell can repair DNA damage. The main pathway to repair UV DNA damaged is the nucleotide excision repair pathway (NER) (Kamileri I. et al, Trends …

Study level
Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

Multi-microbial 3D printing for screening microbiome functions

The ability to 3D print bacteria has relevance to a wide range of applications, ranging from developing novel anti-microbial modalities to probiotics for promoting human health. Traditional culture techniques used in microbiology such as agar plates and suspension cultures have limited spatio-temporal control over the bacteria microenvironment as well as their interaction partners, in particular, mammalian host cells. This project aims to bridge this technological gap by combining 3D printing and microfluidics technologies to spatially control the localization of multiple …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation

An airway chip for screening viral infection mediated immune responses

Respiratory infections such as influenza, SARS-COV-2, COVID-19, and MERS are increasingly prevalent. Complications and related deaths arising from these infections are often the result of a “cytokine storm”, whereby there is an over production of proinflammatory soluble factors by immune cells, which dictates symptoms severity and mortality risk [1]. Recent works showed that immunomodulatory therapy with or without antiviral agents may improve recovery outcome. However, the screening of suitable immune-modulatory and antiviral agents relies heavily on animal models which cannot …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation

Developing in vitro 3D models to understand liver disease

Several studies have demonstrated the appropriateness of 3D organoid cultures over the conventional 2D cultures, the advantages of 3D models include replicating the complex attributes of the liver beyond liver-specific metabolism, such as increased cell density, organization, and cell–cell signalling, O2 zonation.In this project we will establish a novel in vitro 3D model to study hepatocyte biology in the context of liver disease. A more comprehensive approach to investigating the intercellular mechanisms of NAFLD will include co-culture of organoids with …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

Identification and functional characterisation of genetic modifiers of iron overload

Iron is an element essential for virtually all life forms; aberrant iron metabolism is linked to many diseases. These include cancers, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, iron overload and iron deficiency disorders, iron-loading anaemias, and the anaemia associated with chronic disease. Central to proper iron regulation is the appropriate expression and activity of the liver-expressed regulatory peptide, hepcidin, and the iron exporter, ferroportin (FPN). Modulating the expression and activity of hepcidin and FPN, and their interaction is …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

Understanding the role of TGF signalling intermediates in liver and iron-related disease

Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and its family members is involved in many phases of liver disease development and iron regulation. We have identified unexplored players in liver disease and iron-related disorders: TGF signalling intermediates. In this project, we build on our exciting findings to examine the molecular mechanisms involved in TGF signalling intermediates-mediated disease progression and their potential as targets for liver and iron-related disease.Aim 1: To examine the expression of TGF signalling intermediates in the liver.Aim 2: To …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

Role of Peroxisomes in fatty liver disease

Liver disease is an increasing burden on society, accounting for more than 2 million deaths worldwide. Peroxisomes are multifunctional cellular organelles which are highly enriched in the liver. Our preliminary data shows that defects in a peroxisomal protein affects the ability of the liver to respond to toxic insults. In this research proposal, we build on these important and exciting findings to examine the relationship between peroxisome dysfunction and liver disease.Aim 1: To examine the expression and function of peroxisomal …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

Role of microRNAs (miRNA) in progression and development of liver disease

Liver disease is a significant burden on society, accounting for more than 2 million deaths worldwide. miRNAs can exert causal roles, being pro- or anti-inflammatory, as well as pro- or antifibrotic mediators or being oncogenes as well as tumour suppressor genes. In this project we will identify novel miRNAs which play a role in the progression and development of liver disease and delineate the mechanisms utilised by these miRNAs using cell and mouse models of disease.Aim 1: To identify differentially …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

Targeting Fibrosis: Identification of novel natural compounds to modulate collagen expression

Liver disease is a huge and increasing burden on society; it can be due to a number of different reasons including excessive alcohol consumption, viral infections, and non-alcoholic liver disease. Each of these causes may have a different molecular pathway of developing the disease pathology, but one common feature is there is an injury or insult to the liver. This injury then results in activation of the wound healing process; when this healing process goes awry liver disease can develop, …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

Characterisation of grass pollen allergen extracts for diagnosis and therapy of patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma

Grass pollen allergens are the major outdoor allergen trigger for allergic asthma and rhinitis (hayfever) that affect up to 20% of Australians as well as 500 million people globally. Our research shows that patients with grass pollen allergy from subtropical regions show sensitisation and specific IgE and T cell recognition of allergens from subtropical grass pollens. Whilst allergen specific immunotherapy vaccine treatments are effective at reducing symptoms of hayfever and reduce progression to asthma, some skin prick test and allergen …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

Renewal and differentiation in human neural stem cells and their application to understanding neurological disorders

The effective regeneration of brain tissue requires an understanding of the factors mediating the damage as well as the integration of new/replacement cells to form new functional neural networks. The isolation and expansion of human stem cells and limited neural lineage differentiation have provided the foundation for strategies in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. We utilise iPSC-derived NPCs and patient-derived (Alzheimer’s disease; AD) iPSCs and neural lineage differentiation of hMSCs, iPSC NPCs and AD iPSCs in neuronal and glial culture …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

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