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Plasma nanotechnology

Plasma nanoscience and nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging multidisciplinary research topic focusing on physical, chemical, and biological effects of low-temperature plasmas.

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
Lead unit
School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering

Fabrication and characterisation of high performance battery materials

In the current era of Li-ion batteries, there is an ever-growing demand for even higher energy densities to power mobile devices with increased power consumption and to extend the driving range of electric vehicles. The energy density of a rechargeable battery is determined mainly by the specific capacities and operating voltages of the anode and the cathode. In recent years, active materials have been the main focus of research.Alloy-type Si, Sn, P and Al anodes are demonstrating great promise with …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
Lead unit
School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering

Plasma printing – a new 3D manufacturing platform

Plasma printing technology is a rapidly emerging multidisciplinary research and development topic focused on the development of novel advanced technologies for additive manufacturing and 3D surface modification (3D printing) and roll-to-roll fabrication (2D printing) assisted by atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasmas.

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
Lead unit
School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering

Clinical implementation of 3D printed therapies

The future of healthcare involves the application of 3D and computational technologies throughout the entire patient journey. One early and important application of these technologies involves 3D printing transparent rigid face masks for children and adults with severe facial burns. These masks, called TFO's, provide constant pressure for up to two years to the burn injury. This reduces both scarring and the need for reconstructive surgery.Current fabrication of these highly personalised masks is traumatic, inaccurate and labour intensive; requiring physical …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
Lead unit
School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering

Micro-scale manufacturing of medical devices

Biofabrication research is enabling a transition in medical manufacturing from generic, mass-produced implants to patient-specific solutions with customised external shape and internal porous architecture that mimic natural tissues to improve the healing process.Melt electro-writing is a rapidly emerging manufacturing technique allowing the production of incredibly small polymer and composite devices. Medical applications are of particular importance using this technique as fine porous microstructures can be manufactured that mimic those of natural tissues, improving tissue integration and biological response.A significant problem …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
Lead unit
School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering

Optimisation of nanostructured features for antimicrobial activity

Inspired from the insect wing nanostructures, we have fabricated several surfaces that have efficiently killed bacterial cells.However, some smart changes in nanoscale features immensely affect the bacterial killing rate.There is a need to optimise certain parameters in the fabrication step to enhance the bacterial killing rate.

Study level
Master of Philosophy
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
Lead unit
School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering

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