Filter by faculty:

Found 8 matching student topics

Displaying 1–8 of 8 results

Protein biomarkers to predict immunotherapy response in lung cancers

Immunotherapy has revolutionised cancer treatment in the recent years. It has been successfully used to treat several melanoma and lung cancer patients. However, not all patients respond to immunotherapy. There is a clinical need for biomarkers that can identify lung cancer patients that are most likely to benefit from immunotherapy.In this project, we will employ mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches to carry out proteomic profiling of mononuclear cells and plasma samples from lung cancer patients treated with immunotherapy. Proteome profiles of …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells for the treatment of cancer

Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells are genetically modified immune cells that can recognise and kill cancer cells. They are a type of cancer immunotherapy that can be very effective against certain types of blood cancers and are now approved for use in patients. However, CAR T cells can only benefit a very small proportion of cancer patients at present.The aim of this project is to develop new types of CAR T cells that are more effective and can target …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Harnessing immune-mediated control of blood cancers

Immunotherapy has emerged as a new pillar in cancer treatment. Our research team is investigating how we can improve anti-tumour immune responses against blood cancers.This project is based at QIMR Berghofer (Herston).

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Engineering Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cell for the treatment of cancer

Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells are genetically modified immune cells that can recognise and kill cancer cells. They do so through the CAR, which recognises specific antigens expressed on cancer cells. CAR T cell therapy has emerged as an effective form of cancer immunotherapy in certain types of blood cancers and are now approved for use in patients. However, CAR T cell therapy can only benefit a very small proportion of cancer patients at present because it is very …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Novel therapeutic strategies to treat advanced colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is a very common disease, with over 15,000 new cases diagnosed in Australia annually. Metastatic colorectal cancer describes advanced disease that has spread beyond the primary site. This is very aggressive and incurable in the vast majority of these patients. To improve outcomes for colorectal cancer, we are using cutting edge genomic and cell biology techniques to understand disease heterogeneity and optimise drug response. We are developing novel therapeutic interventions based on unique molecular signatures and are testing …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Immunotherapy for autoimmune disease using T cell receptor-modified T-regulatory cells (PhD)

Autoimmune diseases affect approximately 5% of Australians. Well known examples include type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. These diseases have unpleasant, and sometimes tragic, consequences for the affected person and are a costly burden on our health system. As treatment is often limited to managing symptoms, new therapies for autoimmune diseases are much desired.The autoimmune diseases we study are described as "organ-specific", which means the unwanted immune response attacks either a single organ, or a collection of organs …

Study level
PhD
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Immunotherapy for autoimmune disease using T cell receptor-modified T-regulatory cells

Autoimmune diseases affect approximately 5% of Australians. Well known examples include type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. These diseases have unpleasant, and sometimes tragic, consequences for the affected person and are a costly burden on our health system. As treatment is often limited to managing symptoms, new therapies for autoimmune diseases are much desired.Many autoimmune diseases are tightly associated with inheritance of a particular allele at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC, also called human leucocyte antigen or HLA). …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Spatial profiling of the tumour microenvironment

Lung cancers are the leading cause of cancer related deaths in Australia, with a 5-year survival of 15%. With the emerging success of immune checkpoint blockage leading to durable responses and prolonged survival in 15-40% of cases, there is now a need for predictive biomarkers to guide selection for immunotherapies.The immune contexture of the tumour microenvironment (TME) is an important factor in dictating how well a tumour may respond to immune checkpoint therapies (1). Spatial and immunological composition with cellular …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Page 1 of 1