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Fighting slime with nitroxides and polymers

Biofilms, more commonly recognised as slime, are complex communities of microorganisms, which provide these creatures with a niche where they are able to flourish in conditions where they might not normally survive.Because of this enhanced survivability, bacterial biofilms show enhanced resistance to disinfectant and antibiotic treatment, and are the cause of nearly three quarters of hospital-acquired infections. Nitroxides, molecules that possess a stabilised free radical, are able to disperse these biofilms and make them susceptible to treatment.Our research group is …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Chemistry and Physics
Research centre(s)
Centre for Materials Science

Microbial colonisation of the insoluble components of low- and high-quality fodder

The nutritional quality of fodders, a type of animal feed, varies widely. It's not clear whether the mechanism by which microorganisms in the rumen break down the fibre in low-quality, medium-quality, and high-quality fodders also varies.

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Biology and Environmental Science
Research centre(s)

Molecular mechanisms of bacterial proteins involved in host recognition and defense

Pathogenic bacteria employ a large repertoire of molecular weapons known as virulence factors to infect the host and cause disease. In particular, autotransporter proteins, the largest family of secreted virulence factors in Gram-negative bacteria, promote bacterial colonisation, biofilm formation and host cell invasion and/or damage (1). In response, host cells deploy various antimicrobial strategies, such as the mobilization of copper at the site of infection, which induces bacterial stress. Despite the abundance of autotransporters and their roles in infection, their …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Centre for Immunology and Infection Control

Metagenomic analysis of bacterial contamination screening pooled platelets

Bacterial sepsis is second only to ABO incompatibility as a cause of death from transfusion. Bacterial contamination of platelets is recognised as the most significant residual infectious risk of transfusion in developed countries. Bacterial Contamination Screening (BCS) has been required for testing of pooled and apheresis platelets manufactured by the Blood Service since April 2008. International microbiological culture studies suggest that the incidence of bacterial contamination ranges from 1:3000 to 1:1000 units of apheresis platelets and 1 in 600 to …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

A preclinical evaluation pipeline for new antivirulence drugs targeting multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens

A post-antibiotic era—in which common infections and minor injuries can kill—far from being an apocalyptic fantasy, is instead a very real possibility for the 21st century.’ - WHO, 2014 (1). Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global public health priority. If no action is taken, AMR is predicted to kill more people than cancer and diabetes combined by 2050, with 10 million deaths estimated each year and a global cost of up to 100 trillion USD. New therapies to tackle multidrug …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Centre for Immunology and Infection Control

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