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Hearing colour and seeing sound – switchable optoacoustic imaging agents

Optoacoustic imaging is a relatively new medical imaging technique. It utilises laser light to excite an imaging agent, which in turn converts this light energy into heat. This heat is dissipated as a sound wave, which can be detected with an ultrasound receiver. This technique aims to overcome the minimal penetration depth of fluorescence imaging, and the lack of molecular specificity of ultrasound.In this project we are aiming to develop and synthesize intelligent imaging agents for optoacoustics, which are able …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Chemistry and Physics
Research centre(s)
Centre for Materials Science

Managing motion in radiotherapy treatments

The outcomes of radiotherapy treatments are influenced by patient motion such as breathing during the delivery of the treatment.A number of research projects are available to investigate and develop new techniques for measuring and managing motion during the radiotherapy treatment. These include imaging and surface measurement during treatment.

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Chemistry and Physics
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

Advanced artificial intelligence based ultrasound imaging applications

Our research in the space of advanced quantitative medical imaging is investigating how to use ultrasound as a real time volumetric mapping tool of human tissues, to guide in a reliable and accurate way complex medical procedures1. We have developed several novel methods which make use of the most cutting-edge artificial intelligence technology2. For example, to show where the treatment target and the organs at risk are at all times during treatments in radiation therapy3, 4; or to inform robots …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Clinical Sciences
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

Advanced quantitative ultrasound imaging using capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers

Ultrasound imaging has revolutionised healthcare, as one of the most valuable and cost-effective diagnostic tools in comparison with other diagnostic imaging devices. It is used extensively to examine the unborn baby, heart, breast, neck, musculoskeletal tissues, peripheral vasculature, liver, kidneys and other organs. Major advantages include portability, cost-effectiveness, volumetric real-time capabilities, virtually unlimited resolution, and no reported cases of harm to patients in literature.One of the most promising technologies to replace the traditional piezoelectric crystals used as transducers in ultrasound …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Clinical Sciences
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

Identifying individuals at high risk of Alzheimer’s disease

Dementia is the greatest cause of disability in Australians over the age of 65 years. In the absence of a significant medical breakthrough, more than $6.4 million Australians will be diagnosed with dementia in the next 40 years. The most common form of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease (AD), accounting for 60-80% of cases. The pathogenic process of AD begins decades prior to the clinical onset, so it is likely that treatments need to begin early in the disease process to …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Estimating the evolutionary history of plasmids and viruses

In the case of cellular life - bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes - determining the 'tree of life' is a comparatively well-studied problem.This vertical evolutionary history can be estimated using concatenated gene phylogenies, where single copy marker genes are concatenated into a single multiple sequence alignment which is then used in a phylogenetic tree reconstruction algorithm.Viral genomes and plasmid sequences, meanwhile, are more challenging to fit into a phylogenetic framework.

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Centre for Microbiome Research

Re-imagining community leadership programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people

This project is working with LeadershipFit to re-imagine community leadership development and advance the leadership aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people in community health settings, through Indigenous-led intergenerational knowledge translation mechanisms.Intergenerational transfer of leadership knowledge, wisdom and practices can further improve the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people, having them more actively involved in the process of co-designed and co-led decision-making within their families, organisations and communities.The research team will work collaboratively …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Business and Law
School
School of Management

Mathematical models for diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI)

Mathematical models are becoming increasingly important in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as they provide a mechanistic approach for making a link between tissue microstructure and signals acquired using the medical imaging instrument. For example, diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) is one of the most important contemporary non-invasive modalities for probing tissue structure at the microscopic scale. However, dMRI signal behaviour at high or ultra-high field strengths has shown increased deviation from the classically expected mono-exponential decay. Characterising the underlying mechanism …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Mathematical Sciences

AI-Based Data Analysis on Multiple Imaging Modalities

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), it is estimated CVD takes 17.9 million lives every year. In Australian, the statistical data from the Australia Heart Foundation shows CVD is a major cause of death in Australia. It occupies 26% of all deaths, responsible for an average 118 deaths every day. Four of the main types of CVD are coronary heart disease, strokes and transient ischaemic attack, peripheral …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Computer Science
Research centre(s)
Centre for Data Science

Optical coherence tomography imaging of arterial tissue

The sudden rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques and subsequent thrombosis formations are responsible for most acute vascular syndromes, such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Many victims who are apparently healthy die suddenly with no prior symptoms. Such deaths could be prevented through surgery or alternative medical therapy, if vulnerable plaques were identified earlier in their natural progression. While intravascular methods have been developed to visualize various features of vulnerable plaques, there is no single technique that can accurately predict plaque …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

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