Filter by faculty:

Found 84 matching student topics

Displaying 13–24 of 84 results

Medical selfies and patient generated health data

Smartphones and wearable technologies provide exciting opportunities for patients and health professionals to transform healthcare.Patients can benefit from photos (“medical selfies”) taken on their smartphone to record a condition that they want to discuss with a health professional. Wearable devices allow patients to semi-automatically collect data about their physical activity, sleep, mood, diet, etc.This data can help patients to better understand a health concern, its underlying causes and the impact of treatments.Clinicians, on the other hand, can benefit from medical …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
Lead unit
School of Computer Science

3D-printed soft robotics to simulate popliteal artery endovascular treatment

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is one of the most frequent cardiovascular diseases, affecting over 200 million people at an annual cost of $21 billion.PAD cases are predominately (80%) located within the popliteal artery, a highly flexible vessel behind the knee joint which twists, extends, and bends during standing, walking, and sitting.As a result, active or sedentary lifestyles play an important role in altering the biomechanics leading to popliteal diseases.Furthermore, surgical treatments within the popliteal artery have been inconsistent, with a …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
Lead unit
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering

Topological control over cell behaviour for robust additive tissue biomanufacturing

Hospital departments are adopting medical imaging, modelling, and 3D printing to automate personalised implant manufacture and avoid malpractice related to surgical handcrafting. Although several 3D printed implants are approved for medical use, their therapeutic value remains limited as acellular devices with coarse resolution. The ability to print scaffold implants with cell microenvironment precision has been achieved using melt electrowriting (MEW), an emerging technique frequently applied to produce cell culture scaffolds.In contemporary MEW studies, the effect of materials or pore sizes …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
Lead unit
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering

End of life decision making

Professor Ben White is interested in talking to students who wish to undertake research in the topics of end of life decision making, euthanasia and assisted suicide, withholding and withdrawing life sustaining treatment, advance care planning, adult guardianship or consent to medical treatment.

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy
Faculty
Faculty of Law
Lead unit
Australian Centre for Health Law Research

Light, circadian rhythms and Parkinson’s disease

Up to 98 % of patients with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) have non-motor symptoms (Poewe et al. Nature Rev Dis 2017, 3: 17013) and of those, circadian and sleep disorders are the most common (for review, Gros & Videnovic. 2020, Clin Geriatr Med 36: 119). These symptoms become increasingly prevalent during the course of PD and are key determinants affecting quality of life, advancement of overall disability and placement in nursing homes (Shapira et al. Nat Rev Neurosci 2017,18:435). Circadian and …

Study level
PhD
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

Determining the response to PARP inhibitor treatment of ovarian cancer in mouse xenograft model

Our cellular DNA is constantly under threat from both exogenous and endogenous factors. DNA repair pathways function to maintain genomic stability, preventing deleterious mutations that may ultimately lead to cancer initiation. When a tumour forms, it becomes genetically unstable, allowing environmental adaptation. This genetic instability can also result in gene mutations and protein expression alterations that can be targeted to induce cancer-specific cell death (phenomenon also known as synthetic lethality). For example, it has been shown that cells deficient in …

Study level
Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

Identification and functional characterisation of genetic modifiers of iron overload

Iron is an element essential for virtually all life forms; aberrant iron metabolism is linked to many diseases. These include cancers, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, iron overload and iron deficiency disorders, iron-loading anaemias, and the anaemia associated with chronic disease. Central to proper iron regulation is the appropriate expression and activity of the liver-expressed regulatory peptide, hepcidin, and the iron exporter, ferroportin (FPN). Modulating the expression and activity of hepcidin and FPN, and their interaction is …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

Understanding the role of TGF signalling intermediates in liver and iron-related disease

Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and its family members is involved in many phases of liver disease development and iron regulation. We have identified unexplored players in liver disease and iron-related disorders: TGF signalling intermediates. In this project, we build on our exciting findings to examine the molecular mechanisms involved in TGF signalling intermediates-mediated disease progression and their potential as targets for liver and iron-related disease.Aim 1: To examine the expression of TGF signalling intermediates in the liver.Aim 2: To …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

Role of microRNAs (miRNA) in progression and development of liver disease

Liver disease is a significant burden on society, accounting for more than 2 million deaths worldwide. miRNAs can exert causal roles, being pro- or anti-inflammatory, as well as pro- or antifibrotic mediators or being oncogenes as well as tumour suppressor genes. In this project we will identify novel miRNAs which play a role in the progression and development of liver disease and delineate the mechanisms utilised by these miRNAs using cell and mouse models of disease.Aim 1: To identify differentially …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

Characterise a novel DNA repair protein as a target for cancer therapies

Our cellular DNA is constantly under threat from both exogenous and endogenous factors. DNA repair pathways function to maintain genomic stability, preventing deleterious mutations that may ultimately lead to cancer initiation. Once a tumour does form it will evolve to become even more genetically unstable, allowing environmental adaptation. In terms of cancer treatment, synthetic lethality can exploit tumour-driven mutations and protein expression alterations to induce cancer-specific cell death. One of the best examples is the discovery several years ago that …

Study level
Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

Role of Peroxisomes in fatty liver disease

Liver disease is an increasing burden on society, accounting for more than 2 million deaths worldwide. Peroxisomes are multifunctional cellular organelles which are highly enriched in the liver. Our preliminary data shows that defects in a peroxisomal protein affects the ability of the liver to respond to toxic insults. In this research proposal, we build on these important and exciting findings to examine the relationship between peroxisome dysfunction and liver disease.Aim 1: To examine the expression and function of peroxisomal …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

Characterising the role of PARPs in DNA repair and cancer therapy

The genome of our cells is damaged multiple times each day, by various factors including sunlight and reactive oxygen species. In order for the DNA damage response to be efficient, our cells utilise highly coordinated repair pathways that function accurately and rapidly throughout the damaged cell. Cells that do not repair DNA damage correctly will accumulate damage and display increased genomic instability, which is a key hallmark of cancer cells, promoting their survival and rapid growth. DNA repair pathways are …

Study level
Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
Lead unit
School of Biomedical Sciences

Page 2 of 7