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Found 14 matching student topics

Displaying 1–12 of 14 results

I want to move it, move it: framing and enabling children's active play using novel technology

We're interested in exploring how tangible, embodied and embedded interactions (TEIs) can be used to facilitate active play in young children (age 3-5 years old). In this project you’ll explore how existing technologies are used to provide children with opportunities for active play, be involved in the design and development of new TEIs, and evaluate how these TEIs might facilitate sustained engagement with active play.This student project is part of a larger research project at QUT, which means you will …

Study level
PhD
Faculty
Faculty of Creative Industries, Education and Social Justice
School
School of Design
Research centre(s)

Design Lab

Post-translational modification of proteins in cancer

The Protein Ablation Cancer Therapeutics (PACT) laboratory are interested in understanding how post-translational modifications contribute to the tumorigenic functions of proteins in cancer cells. We hypothesise that particular post-translational modifications are required for the cancer-associated function of a protein and that prevention of these would be a useful approach to treating cancer.The aim of this project is to select a candidate protein from our database of potential targets, confirm the protein is modified, identify the key modified lysine in the …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
1043076
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Identification and characterisation of IRX4 isoforms as novel targets in prostate cancer

Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in Australian men. There is no cure for advanced prostate cancer patients who develop resistance to currently available treatments. Alternative splicing (AS) is tightly regulated to maintain genomic stability in humans (Liyanage et al 2019). Aberrant RNA splicing of cancer-causing genes has been reported as a major cause of treatment escape in prostate cancer patients. Iroquois-class homeodomain protein 4 (IRX4) is a TALE homeobox transcription factor which has been …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
1043076
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Molecular modelling and simulations of anionic molecules

Biomolecular recognition refers to the interaction between a macromolecule (usually a protein or a nucleic acid) and a target molecule. Most often obtaining 3D experimental data is not trivial at atomistic scale. Computational methods offer the possibility of precisely describing all types of ligand–macromolecule interactions and are therefore a promising avenue to obtain that information, to test or discard a large variety of hypotheses regarding molecular recognition, folding of proteins/peptides and/or to select, among the vast chemical space of potential …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Chemistry and Physics
Research centre(s)
Centre for Genomics and Personalised Health

Understanding the external surface of fungal mycelia

The way in which fungal cultures grow in liquid cultures are can have a major impact on scale up and producing material. Here, we will examine the growth of three fast-growing filamentous fungi and try understand how various growth parameters affect the morphology that will range from loose mycelia to compact pellets.Fungal morphology is affected by inoculum (form, concentration and growth stage), media components (type and concentration of carbon, nitrogen and phosphate, trace minerals, pH, salt content), dissolved gases (dissolved …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Biology and Environmental Science
Research centre(s)
Centre for Agriculture and the Bioeconomy

The pulse of sustainability: Interventions to sustainably increase legume production and consumption

Legume-supported value chains, from production to consumption, provide benefits to people and nature that include improved ecosystem functions and resource use efficiency, as well as farmed animal and human health provisions. Environmental co-benefits of legumes include reduced nitrate leaching, increased food sources for pollinators, a greater structural diversity of farmland, and improved soil fertility. Despite the potential of legumes to improve the sustainability of cropping systems and enhance human health, the production and consumption of legumes in Australia is low.Multiple …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Biology and Environmental Science
Research centre(s)
Centre for Agriculture and the Bioeconomy

Improving protein synthesis by codon optimisation in nicotiana benthamiana

Nicotiana benthamiana is a widely used model plant and the species of choice for studying gene expression and protein synthesis. Today, N. benthamiana is used as a plant biofactory worldwide for the production of pharmaceuticals including antibodies and protein-based vaccines.Optimum codon usage plays a critical role in determining effective translation of a gene, which ultimately affect protein production. Despite a number of codon optimisation tools available for N. benthamiana, little studies has been done to demonstrate the efficacy of the …

Study level
Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Biology and Environmental Science
Research centre(s)
Centre for Agriculture and the Bioeconomy

Identifying protein and metabolite markers of burn injury and trauma

It can be difficult for clinical teams to determine the severity of burn injuries when the patient first presents to the hospital. This is because burn wounds continue to deepen/progress over time, in a process known as burn wound conversion. Some wounds may deepen over days or weeks and require aggressive surgical treatment e.g. grafting, and some wounds don’t progress, stay superficial in depth, and they can be managed conservatively with the application of different bandages or dressings. We have …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
1043076
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Characterising a DNA repair protein as an anti-cancer therapeutic target and diagnostic marker in brain cancer

Cancer is the single biggest clinical problem facing the world and will account for half of all global deaths by 2030. Even though there have been significant advances in immunotherapy, we are still unable to cure most cancers. New therapeutic targets, individualised to patient needs, must be identified and validated in order to improve cancer outcomes.Brain cancer causes more deaths in people under the age of 40 than any other cancer and more deaths in children than any other disease. …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
1043076
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)
Centre for Genomics and Personalised Health

Towards Synthetic protein-structures based on precision macromolecules: can we beat nature in designing catalysts?

Up for a challenge? In this project you can explore if you can beat nature in making catalytic systems! Over billions of years, nature has perfected the design and synthesis of high molecular weight precision macromolecules, which are able to execute a specific function in a complex biological environment such as proteins.

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Chemistry and Physics
Research centre(s)
Centre for Materials Science

Understanding the role of the hSSB1 protein in the response to UV induced DNA damage

Melanoma is the 4th most common cancer in Australia. The link between skin cancer and UV exposure is now well established. If a DNA damage induced by UV exposure is left unrepaired, the mutation generated in the genome can lead to cell death or cancer. It is thus highly important to understand of how a cell can repair DNA damage. The main pathway to repair UV DNA damaged is the nucleotide excision repair pathway (NER) (Kamileri I. et al, Trends …

Study level
Honours
Faculty
1043076
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Characterise a novel DNA repair protein as a target for cancer therapies

Study level
Honours
Faculty
1043076
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

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