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Spatial localisation of immunoglobulin A in the gastrointestinal tract.

Blood cancers, which include leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma account for 10% of all cancers and 9.4% of cancer deaths. Stem cell transplantation (SCT) is the predominant curative therapy for these diseases. However, a major complication is graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in which the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, skin, lung and liver are preferentially damaged by the transplanted donor immune system, limiting the therapeutic potential of this treatment. Thus, there is a pressing need for new treatment approaches to improve transplant outcome for …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Atmospheric cooling and shading for the Great Barrier Reef

This research sits within the Cooling and Shading Subprogram of the Reef Restoration and Adaptation Program (RRAP).RRAP is an ambitious and innovative R&D effort that places Australia as the leader of coral reef adaptation and restoration science. It is a consortium of Partners, including QUT, dedicated to creating an innovative toolkit of interventions to help the Reef resist, adapt to, and recover from the impacts of climate change. These partners include the Australian Institute of Marine Science, CSIRO, the Great …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

Investigation of host tissue response to synthetic pelvic meshes in patients with complications

Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a prevalent disease affecting 37% of asymptomatic women. Pelvic mesh implantation is a common surgical procedure employed to treat stress urinary incontinence, rectal prolapse and pelvic organ prolapse. However, the use of pelvic meshes can cause complications such as erosion, infection, pain and discomfort, which sometimes require further surgery. In Australia, in November 2017, the TGA banned transvaginal mesh for prolapse. Currently, women with complications from their pelvic mesh may opt to have them surgically …

Study level
Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

Investigate, design and develop a trusted data sharing and decision making platform for enterprise applications

Blockchain technology relies on a consensus protocol to agree on the state of the system through data. Existing consensus algorithms rely on pre-defined rules, which are used to verify whether the data is obeying all the rules. This model of consensus may be suitable for broad classes of distributed and multi-stakeholder applications. Still, it does not cover applications that require consensus among human operators in the enterprise setting. This project investigates the possibility of achieving consensus through lightweight mechanisms.

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Computer Science

Investigating genetic variants involved in Wilson disease and copper metabolism using genome editing

Wilson disease (WD) is a genetic disorder of copper metabolism. It can present with hepatic and neurological symptoms, due to copper accumulation in the liver and brain (1). WD is caused by compound heterozygosity or homozygosity for mutations in the copper transporting P-type ATPase gene ATP7B. Over 700 ATP7B genetic variants have been associated with WD. Estimates for WD population prevalence vary with 1 in 30,000 generally quoted. Early diagnosis and treatment are important for successful management of the disease. …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)
Centre for Genomics and Personalised Health

Investigating the activities of clinically significant arboviruses from 2002 to 2017 in Australia: possible implications for blood transfusion safety

Arboviruses are a significant concern for public health in Australia and worldwide. More than 75 arboviruses have been identified in Australia.1 Three of the most common and clinically important arboviruses in Australia today include Ross River virus (RRV), Barmah Forest virus (BFV) and dengue virus (DENV). These mosquito-borne diseases have exhibited an upward trend in case numbers in Australia since 2002.Concern has arisen that these numbers will only continue to increase as a result of climate change. Vector-borne disease risk …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Investigating differences in downstream signalling mediated by two isoforms of FGFR2 in endometrial cancer

FGFR2 encodes two alternatively spliced isoforms that differ in their ligand binding domain and the combination of tissue specific expression of these isoforms and tissue specific expression of the FGF ligands is the foundation of normal paracrine signalling. Isoform switching from FGFR2b (inclusion of exon 8) to FGFR2c (inclusion of exon 9) occurs in tumorigenesis as it establishes an autocrine loop in epithelial cancer cells.We have previously published a detailed investigation into differences between wildtype FGFR2b and mutant FGFR2b following …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Investigating the role of Neuropilin-1 in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer metastasis and chemoresistance

Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are negative for Estrogen Receptor, Progesterone Receptor and HER2 expression, are clinically aggressive and are unresponsive to the available hormonal or targeted drugs used for other breast cancer subtypes, so that TNBC patients rely mainly on chemotherapy. TNBC accounts for 15-20% of all invasive breast cancer and patients have increased risk of recurrence, mortality and early metastatic progression. Thus, there is an urgent clinical need to develop improved treatment strategies for TNBC. Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) is a …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Investigating immunosuppression downstream of activated FGFR2 in endometrial cancer

FGFR2 encodes two alternatively spliced isoforms that differ in their ligand binding domain and the combination of tissue specific expression of these isoforms and tissue specific expression of the FGF ligands is the foundation of normal paracrine signalling. Isoform switching from FGFR2b (inclusion of exon 8) to FGFR2c (inclusion of exon 9) occurs in tumorigenesis as it establishes an autocrine loop in epithelial cancer cells. Our lab has reported that FGFR2 activation by mutations or isoform switching is associated with …

Study level
PhD
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Investigating DNA repair mechanisms in aging adult stem cells

When we age the DNA repair systems of our cells become down regulated. This results in reduced DNA repair capacity, enhanced rates of mutation load and may lead to the development of chronic aging-associated diseases including osteoporosis, Alzheimer's and cancer(1). So it is no surprise that genome instability and stem cell exhaustion, which also strongly correlates with the accumulation of DNA damage, are considered hallmarks of aging(2).However, we still lack a clear understanding on how the decrease in DNA repair …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Investigation of genetic factors that contribute to concussion and its outcomes

The health outcomes from traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) and concussion depend on the nature of the injury, but response also varies greatly between individuals, suggesting that genetic factors may play a role. In particular, due to effects of head trauma on balances of ions, neurotransmitters and energy use in the brain, there is suggestion that variation in the genes that encode proteins involved in these pathways, e.g. ion channels, may affect the risk of, as well as response to a …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Medical litigation, medical law and compensation for medical negligence

Tina Cockburn is interested in supervising PhD students in the area of patient safety law — focusing on medical litigation and compensation for medical negligence, communication of information to patients (including consent and post treatment open disclosure), regulation of health care professionals and the regulation of innovative medical treatment and new technologies.

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy
Faculty
Faculty of Business and Law
School
School of Law
Research centre(s)

Australian Centre for Health Law Research

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