Filter by faculty:

Found 21 matching student topics

Displaying 1–12 of 21 results

Using mathematics to understand multiple sclerosis: what causes the immune system to attack the brain?

Every day, we use our bodies to move, think, talk and eat, but for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) these tasks can be virtually impossible. MS is a chronic disease which develops because the immune system has started to attack the nerve cells in the brain. This causes the degradation of parts of the brain and irreversible impairment in physical and mental activity. Unfortunately, this disease has no cure, and while considerable therapeutic advances against this disease have been achieved, …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Mathematical Sciences

An airway chip for screening viral infection mediated immune responses

Respiratory infections such as influenza, SARS-COV-2, , and MERS are increasingly prevalent. Complications and related deaths arising from these infections are often the result of a “cytokine storm”, whereby there is an over production of proinflammatory soluble factors by immune cells, which dictates symptoms severity and mortality risk [1]. Recent works showed that immunomodulatory therapy with or without antiviral agents may improve recovery outcome. However, the screening of suitable immune-modulatory and antiviral agents relies heavily on animal models which cannot …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Interaction between pollen proteases and ACE2 receptor of SARS-CoV-2

Pollen allergy is a common seasonal respiratory disease triggered by hypersensitivity to pollen affecting 10-30% of adults and 40% of children, and is a predisposing factor for asthma. Pollens interact with airway epithelium to both stimulate innate immunity and elicit an adaptive immune response.Proteolytic activity is one route that stimulates release of alarmins and pro-inflammatory cytokines from mucosal epithelia. Previous studies have found the expression of Serine/Cysteine (Ser/Cys) proteases in some types of grass pollen grains, but it is not …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Immunotherapy for autoimmune disease using T cell receptor-modified T-regulatory cells (PhD)

Autoimmune diseases affect approximately 5% of Australians. Well known examples include type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. These diseases have unpleasant, and sometimes tragic, consequences for the affected person and are a costly burden on our health system. As treatment is often limited to managing symptoms, new therapies for autoimmune diseases are much desired.The autoimmune diseases we study are described as "organ-specific", which means the unwanted immune response attacks either a single organ, or a collection of organs …

Study level
PhD
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Immunotherapy for autoimmune disease using T cell receptor-modified T-regulatory cells

Autoimmune diseases affect approximately 5% of Australians. Well known examples include type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. These diseases have unpleasant, and sometimes tragic, consequences for the affected person and are a costly burden on our health system. As treatment is often limited to managing symptoms, new therapies for autoimmune diseases are much desired.Many autoimmune diseases are tightly associated with inheritance of a particular allele at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC, also called human leucocyte antigen or HLA). …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Harnessing immune-mediated control of blood cancers

Immunotherapy has emerged as a new pillar in cancer treatment. Our research team is investigating how we can improve anti-tumour immune responses against blood cancers.This project is based at QIMR Berghofer (Herston).

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Defining human immune responses to a healthy gut microbiome

Many human diseases are thought to involve interactions between the gut microbiome and the immune system which shape the nature and function of immunity. These interactions between host and environment are thought to be critical regulators of health and disease.In autoimmune diseases many studies have associated presence or absence of particular microbial species with diseases and some studies have shown influence of disease-related genetics on the composition of the gut microbiome. However, no studies to date have formally addressed the …

Study level
PhD
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Centre for Microbiome Research

Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells for the treatment of cancer

Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells are genetically modified immune cells that can recognise and kill cancer cells. They are a type of cancer immunotherapy that can be very effective against certain types of blood cancers and are now approved for use in patients. However, CAR T cells can only benefit a very small proportion of cancer patients at present.The aim of this project is to develop new types of CAR T cells that are more effective and can target …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Protein biomarkers to predict immunotherapy response in lung cancers

Immunotherapy has revolutionised cancer treatment in the recent years. It has been successfully used to treat several melanoma and lung cancer patients. However, not all patients respond to immunotherapy. There is a clinical need for biomarkers that can identify lung cancer patients that are most likely to benefit from immunotherapy.In this project, we will employ mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches to carry out proteomic profiling of mononuclear cells and plasma samples from lung cancer patients treated with immunotherapy. Proteome profiles of …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Development of methods to analyse cells in 3D bioengineered human tumour models

Over the past few decades, cancer mortality has risen more than 2.6-folds in Australia, mandating novel research to study and understand the mechanisms of cancer biology. Recent advancements in technology have led to development of novel scaffold-based, bioengineered 3D tumour models that recapitulate the complex, in vivo cancer microenvironment better than the conventional 2D monolayer cultures.Specifically, tumour cells encapsulated in hydrogel systems are widely used as effective 3D tumour models because of how closely they mimic the native tissue extracellular …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

Engineering Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cell for the treatment of cancer

Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells are genetically modified immune cells that can recognise and kill cancer cells. They do so through the CAR, which recognises specific antigens expressed on cancer cells. CAR T cell therapy has emerged as an effective form of cancer immunotherapy in certain types of blood cancers and are now approved for use in patients. However, CAR T cell therapy can only benefit a very small proportion of cancer patients at present because it is very …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Spatial localisation of immunoglobulin A in the gastrointestinal tract.

Blood cancers, which include leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma account for 10% of all cancers and 9.4% of cancer deaths. Stem cell transplantation (SCT) is the predominant curative therapy for these diseases. However, a major complication is graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in which the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, skin, lung and liver are preferentially damaged by the transplanted donor immune system, limiting the therapeutic potential of this treatment. Thus, there is a pressing need for new treatment approaches to improve transplant outcome for …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Page 1 of 2