Filter by faculty:

Found 10 matching student topics

Displaying 1–10 of 10 results

Exploring exosomes as potential cancer biomarkers

Aims and MethodologyOur team investigates specific mechanisms in which cancer cells communicate with the environment in order to promote disease progression. In particular, we aim to understand the processes employed by cancer-derived small extracellular vesicles, termed exosomes, to promote the spread of cancer cells from the primary site to distal organs. Additionally, our group analyses the molecular composition of exosomes isolated from the blood of cancer patients, in order to establish innovative cancer-specific signatures that will ultimately improve cancer diagnosis …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

PSA splice variant in prostate cancer diagnosis and pathogenesis

Current clinical prostate cancer screening is heavily reliant on measuring serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels. However, two-thirds of these men will not have cancer on biopsy and conversely, other prostate diseases. As a result, for ~75% of patients the large number of indolent tumours diagnosed has led to significant overtreatment creating an urgent need for appropriate prognostic assays that can distinguish indolent, slow growing tumours from the more aggressive and lethal phenotypes. PSA/KLK3 is a member of the tissue-kallikrein …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Characterising a DNA repair protein as an anti-cancer therapeutic target and diagnostic marker in brain cancer

Cancer is the single biggest clinical problem facing the world and will account for half of all global deaths by 2030. Even though there have been significant advances in immunotherapy, we are still unable to cure most cancers. New therapeutic targets, individualised to patient needs, must be identified and validated in order to improve cancer outcomes.Brain cancer causes more deaths in people under the age of 40 than any other cancer and more deaths in children than any other disease. …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)
Centre for Genomics and Personalised Health

Biological and clinical impact of the association of germline variations in KLK3 (PSA) gene in prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer (after skin cancers) in Australian males, and the second most common cause of cancer death. While the 5-year survival rate for localised disease approaches 100%, extra-prostatic invasion results in a poorer prognosis. Kallikreins are serine proteases, which are part of an enzymatic cascade pathway activated in prostate cancer (Lawrence et al 2010). The most well-known member is prostate specific antigen (PSA) or the KLK3 protein, encoded by the Kallikrein 3 (KLK3) gene, …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Protein biomarkers to predict immunotherapy response in lung cancers

Immunotherapy has revolutionised cancer treatment in the recent years. It has been successfully used to treat several melanoma and lung cancer patients. However, not all patients respond to immunotherapy. There is a clinical need for biomarkers that can identify lung cancer patients that are most likely to benefit from immunotherapy.In this project, we will employ mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches to carry out proteomic profiling of mononuclear cells and plasma samples from lung cancer patients treated with immunotherapy. Proteome profiles of …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

DNA markers of burn injury and trauma

Burns cause physical and psychological trauma. Patients often experience prolonged treatment to enable their wounds to heal, and may experience scarring and repeated operations. Patients often experience distress related to the initial injury and ongoing management, and are at risk of developing PTSD. The patients who are more likely to develop heightened trauma reactions, long-term psychological sequelae and wound healing with scarring and surgery, need to be identified early in the treatment pathway, for improved management. It is also important …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Identifying protein and metabolite markers of burn injury and trauma

It can be difficult for clinical teams to determine the severity of burn injuries when the patient first presents to the hospital. This is because burn wounds continue to deepen/progress over time, in a process known as burn wound conversion. Some wounds may deepen over days or weeks and require aggressive surgical treatment e.g. grafting, and some wounds don’t progress, stay superficial in depth, and they can be managed conservatively with the application of different bandages or dressings. We have …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Determining the response to PARP inhibitor treatment of ovarian cancer in mouse xenograft model

Our cellular DNA is constantly under threat from both exogenous and endogenous factors. DNA repair pathways function to maintain genomic stability, preventing deleterious mutations that may ultimately lead to cancer initiation. When a tumour forms, it becomes genetically unstable, allowing environmental adaptation. This genetic instability can also result in gene mutations and protein expression alterations that can be targeted to induce cancer-specific cell death (phenomenon also known as synthetic lethality). For example, it has been shown that cells deficient in …

Study level
Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Characterisation of melanoma cell membranes to identify novel drug targets

Cell membrane structure and function are altered during tumour development, but to date comprehensive studies on the characterisation of cell membranes of a given cancer are scarce, or are only focused on a particular property (e.g. overall charge, global lipid composition, or specific lipid). In preliminary work we compared the lipidome (i.e. the lipid profile) of a panel of cells, and found the lipid composition of model melanoma cells to be distinct from that of other cancerous and non-cancerous cells. …

Study level
PhD
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Identification of novel melanoma biomarkers using exosomes

Tumour cells excrete exosomes, membrane vesicles (30-150 nm diameter) that encapsulate and transport proteins, metabolites and genetic material. They mediate intercellular communication within the tumor microenvironment, metastasis formation via circulation, and development of drug resistance. Circulating tumor-derived exosomes can be isolated from blood patients as a non-invasive liquid biopsy.The chemical composition and overall properties of the exosomal membranes are expected to be similar to those of parent cell membranes and to modulate blood circulation time, and uptake and targeting of …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Page 1 of 1