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Trust in Internet-of-Things with blockchain

Blockchain is an unchangeable, distributed database that provides trust in data once it is stored on the database. However, in Internet-of-Things (IoT), the data is an observation of physical context and is susceptible to noise, drift, or malicious alterations. Sensors may even be decoupled from their intended context by an attacker, which may compromise the blockchain data and its value for guiding decisions.This project aims to develop an innovative approach for pervasive trust in IoT, underpinned by blockchain. The research …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Computer Science

Powerful enzymes to break stuff and make stuff

We need new ways to re-use and recycle complex polymers like plastics and biomass. With biological approaches we could potentially break polymers down into their monomeric components and convert these into new and different materials.This project focuses on improving our understanding of laccases - a powerful class of enzymes that can both break down and rebuild lignin (and potentially some plastics).There is a big functional divergence between bacterial and fungal laccases. Fungal laccases have very high redox potentials and can …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Biology and Environmental Science
Research centre(s)
Centre for Agriculture and the Bioeconomy

Engineering Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cell for the treatment of cancer

Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells are genetically modified immune cells that can recognise and kill cancer cells. They do so through the CAR, which recognises specific antigens expressed on cancer cells. CAR T cell therapy has emerged as an effective form of cancer immunotherapy in certain types of blood cancers and are now approved for use in patients. However, CAR T cell therapy can only benefit a very small proportion of cancer patients at present because it is very …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

A preclinical evaluation pipeline for new antivirulence drugs targeting multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens

A post-antibiotic era—in which common infections and minor injuries can kill—far from being an apocalyptic fantasy, is instead a very real possibility for the 21st century.’ - WHO, 2014 (1). Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global public health priority. If no action is taken, AMR is predicted to kill more people than cancer and diabetes combined by 2050, with 10 million deaths estimated each year and a global cost of up to 100 trillion USD. New therapies to tackle multidrug …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Characterisation of emerging multidrug resistant E. coli pathogens

The last fifteen years have witnessed an unprecedented rise in the rates of antimicrobial resistance among Gram-negative bacteria, described by the World Health organisation as a global health crisis (1). Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (E. coli ST131) is a ‘high-risk’ group of Gram-negative pathogens that have emerged rapidly and spread worldwide in the period of the last 10 years (2). E. coli ST131 strains are typically resistant to multiple classes of antibiotics and cause bloodstream and urinary tract infections …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Molecular mechanisms of bacterial proteins involved in host recognition and defense

Pathogenic bacteria employ a large repertoire of molecular weapons known as virulence factors to infect the host and cause disease. In particular, autotransporter proteins, the largest family of secreted virulence factors in Gram-negative bacteria, promote bacterial colonisation, biofilm formation and host cell invasion and/or damage (1). In response, host cells deploy various antimicrobial strategies, such as the mobilisation of copper at the site of infection, which induces bacterial stress.Despite the abundance of autotransporters and their roles in infection, their mechanisms …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Testing of novel antibiotic-loaded nanoparticles for treatment of Chlamydia infection

C. trachomatis, sexually transmitted infections of both the female and male human reproductive tract, affects approximately 127 million people globally each year. The major concerning sequela of C. trachomatis infection is infertility in both men and women. This occurs by damaging the upper reproductive tracts, the ovaries and testes most importantly.The majority of research has been focussed on female disease, and male disease has been underestimated and understudied, particularly therapeutics for male infections. Antibiotic therapy is the only therapy currently …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Tree-chain: a fast lightweight consensus algorithm for IoT applications

In recent years, blockchain adaptation in IoT has received tremendous attention due to its salient features including distributed management, security, anonymity, and auditability. However, conventional blockchains are significantly resource demanding and suffer from lack of throughput, delay in committing transactions, and low efficiency. We recently introduced a novel blockchain consensus algorithm known as Tree-chain, that bases the validator selection on an existing feature in all blockchains: hash function. Tree-chain achieves a fast throughput while ensuring the randomness and unpredictability of …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Computer Science

Managing motion in radiotherapy treatments

The outcomes of radiotherapy treatments are influenced by patient motion such as breathing during the delivery of the treatment.A number of research projects are available to investigate and develop new techniques for measuring and managing motion during the radiotherapy treatment. These include imaging and surface measurement during treatment.

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Chemistry and Physics
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

Monte-Carlo modelling in radiotherapy

Various research projects are available in the use of monte-carlo techniques in radiotherapy and medical imaging. These include modelling radiotherapy linear accelerators, radiobiology, patient dosimetric verification and in-vivo treatment verification using electronic portal imaging devices.span

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Chemistry and Physics
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

Metabarcoding analysis of microbiota in pasture grasses

Pasture dieback has afflicted a wide range of grasses across Queensland and New South Wales, causing immense economic damage.To help better understand this dieback, you will analyse the microbiome of grasses from field plots and controlled laboratory experiments using 16S amplicon metabarcoding.You will work as part of a larger team studying pasture dieback at QUT.

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Biology and Environmental Science
Research centre(s)
Centre for Agriculture and the Bioeconomy

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