Filter by faculty:

Found 9 matching student topics

Displaying 1–9 of 9 results

A golden approach to nanomedicine. Gold-polymer hybrid nanoparticles

Gold, a precious metal, is also highly valued for the production of highly functional nanoparticles.Gold nanoparticles interact with light and microwaves to generate heat and light, which can be used in nanomedicine for therapy or imaging.This project will look at developing polymer-gold hybrid nanoparticles to improve disease delivery and therapy. This project involves:polymer synthesismaterials formulationcharacterisation. …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Chemistry and Physics
Research centre(s)
Centre for Materials Science

Plasma medicine

Plasma medicine is a rapidly emerging multidisciplinary research topic focusing on various treatments of diseases using low-temperature plasmas generated in gases using electric fields.

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Chemistry and Physics
Research centre(s)
Centre for Materials Science

Mapping specificity of allergen recognition for precision medicine in allergic rhinitis and asthma

Approximately two thirds of the 19.3% of Australians with allergic rhinitis (hayfever) are allergic to grass pollen allergens. The QUT Allergy Research Group has shown regional differences in patterns of allergic sensitisation to grass pollens of different subfamilies of grasses. Whilst the major allergen components have been cloned and expressed, and the relative avidity of patient serum IgE to a panel of these allergens has been determined, the comparative epitope specificity of patient serum IgE for related allergens from different …

Study level
Master of Philosophy
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Precision of allergen specific immunotherapy for personalized care of patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma

Allergic rhinitis (hayfever) affects 19.3% of Australians as well as 500 million people worldwide. Grass pollen allergens are the major outdoor allergen trigger globally. Grass pollen allergy is also an important trigger for asthma, including thunderstorm asthma epidemics, and exposure to pollen allergen can diminish antiviral immunity, which is of particular interest in relation the impact of allergies on COVID. Our research shows that patients with grass pollen allergy from subtropical regions show sensitisation and specific IgE and T cell …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Impact of organoid culture on molecular characteristics and immune cell signal of bladder cancer (BIOM04)

Project code:BIOM04Area of research:CancerProject aims and objectives:Bladder cancer (BlCa) is the 9th most common cancer in Queensland, with an estimated 53% five-year survival rate in Australians. Treatment options for superficial, locally advanced and metastatic BlCa include platinum-based chemotherapy and intravesical immunotherapy in the form of a bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine - a weakened, live bacterium that stimulates the immune response. As a result of developed resistance or progressive growth, BlCa tumour recurrence is a common clinical outcome. Thus, there is …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Patient specific modelling of the human shoulder joint complex

Modern advanced manufacturing techniques have the potential to revolutionise the patient-specific orthopaedic implant space. Many of the existing orthopaedic joint replacements offer a modular design, allowing surgeons to select the size of each component to suit their patient.However in some joints, for example the shoulder, the conditions that lead to a shoulder replacement (osteoarthritis of the shoulder and rotator cuff tears) also create anatomical anomalies that are challenging to correct with generic implant shapes.The advent of titanium 3D printing provides …

Study level
Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering
Research centre(s)

Bio-nano technology for immune defence

A fully-functioning immune system is essential to maintain good health, though such a system deteriorates with advancing age, contributing to increased susceptibility to infection, autoimmunity, and cancer.Relatively little research has been conducted on the impact of ageing on the innate immune response, which plays a crucial role in protecting against infection and represents a first line of defence. Macrophages are central effector cells of the innate immune system and have many diverse functions. This means age-related impairments in macrophage function …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering
Research centre(s)

Improving mechanical properties of hydrogels for tissue engineering

Hydrogels provide a hydrated, extracellular, matrix-like environment that allow for the culturing and study of cells. However, hydrogels are typically soft and fragile, which limits their potential for load-bearing applications such as cartilage tissue engineering.This project aims to improve the mechanical properties of hydrogels for tissue engineering using a range of experimental and theoretical approaches.

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

Production of medicinal compounds from mushroom species cultured in solid state fermentation

Australia generates thousands of tonnes of organic waste residues related to agriculture (e.g. sugar and cotton industries). These are generally unsuitable as bacterial growth substrates, but can be utilised by fungi.Fungi have developed an array of enzymes that allow them to access cellular building blocks and energy stored in recalcitrant carbon or ligno-cellulosic/hemi-cellulosic waste material.The aim of this project is to harness the fungi’s ability to access this carbon and generate fungal biomass (mycelia and fruiting bodies) that contain medicinal …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Biology and Environmental Science
Research centre(s)

Page 1 of 1