Building and planning short courses

Single-unit study

You can study individual units for personal or professional development without having to apply for a full QUT course.

If you successfully complete a unit, you may be eligible for credit if you decide to apply for a degree course in the future.

Units anyone can study

These units don’t have any requirements for previous study or background knowledge.

But if your previous studies were not in English, or were completed in a country where English is not the first language, you will need to demonstrate that you meet our English proficiency requirements when you apply.

Architecture

  • DAB103 Architectural Visualisation 1

    Architects work in three dimensions and thus employ a variety of tools to think about and communicate three-dimensional ideas. This unit introduces you to the basic skills and techniques you'll need to support this design visualisation with a focus on analogue media, simple model making, and fundamental drawing skills; both technical and expressive/exploratory.

  • DAB220 Architecture, Culture and Place

    The concept of place is highly significant to architectural thought and production. This introductory unit surveys the concept of place in the discourse and practice of architecture and explores how place is in understood, interpreted and made in a range of cultural, historical and physical contexts.

  • DAB325 Architecture in the 20th Century

    Designers in any discipline should possess the ability to appreciate the history of art, design and architecture. In addition, they should be able to analyse developments in design history from multiple perspectives. This unit is a survey course of the history and theory of architecture from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Teaching and learning takes place through three forms of structured activity: lectures, tutorials, and online.

  • DAB330 Integrated Technologies 1

    This is the first discipline-based unit in the Technology and Science design stream, through the introduction and application of the architectural principles for Environmental Design (including sustainability, lighting, and acoustics), Construction, and Structures. It introduces students to the basic technologies and sciences associated with architectural practice and in particular technical skills required for simple design projects. Thermal characteristics of building materials, bioclimatic chart analysis, climate and climatic elements as environmental factors influencing architectural design, basic climatic regions and climate responsive building design, solar heating and cooling of buildings, thermal performance analysis, environmentally sustainable building materials, colour, natural and artificial lighting, ventilation, and condensation will be forming the Environmental Design topics.

Bioscience

  • EVB102 Ecosystems and the Environment

    In EVB102 Ecosystems and the Environment you will focus on broad-scale factors that shape ecological systems to assess ecosystem change and human impacts on the environment. As well as providing an introduction to the science of ecology, this unit further develops foundation knowledge and skills developed through Semester 1, and prepares you for the exploration of global environmental issues.

Civil engineering

  • EGB100 Engineering Sustainability and Professional Practice

    This is an introductory unit for all engineering disciplines. It provides you with a wide appreciation of the engineering profession, its achievements and current and future challenges. It will introduce you to the concept of sustainability and how sustainability impacts current and future engineering ventures. It will also develop your professional skills that will be essential to your functioning as an effective professional engineer both individually and as part of a team.

Design

  • DEB100 Design and Sustainability

    This unit, with its special focus on the role and impact of designers to shift society toward a more environmentally sustainable way of living, introduces you to essential academic and professional skills and practices for learning to become a designer.

  • DEB202 Introducing Design History

    This unit encompasses a broad survey of the history of design from the civilizations of antiquity to the opening of the 20th century - including architecture, industrial design, interior design and landscape architecture. It is a first year foundation unit and serves as preparation for more detailed and specialised studies in history and theory in subsequent years. Key designs, ideas and artefacts and the aesthetic, environmental, technological, socio-cultural and political factors that related to their production will be analysed.

Energy & process engineering

  • PCB121 Vision, Colour and Photometry

    This is the first unit in the lighting suite of courses and aims to prepare students with the necessary grounding for future units in the course. All lectures in units that follow this will assume a good knowledge and understanding of the concepts and principles presented in this unit.

  • PCB124 Lamps and Luminaires

    This is an important unit in the lighting suite of courses because it describes the basic equipment that people working in any area of the lighting industry have to know and understand – the lights themselves. Understanding how a lamp works and how it performs helps people make informed decisions about the choices they have in choosing lamps for particular applications. All lectures in units that follow this will assume a good knowledge and understanding of the principles, properties and performances of light sources, including the emerging LED products.

Industrial design

  • DNB103 Product Visualisation 1

    Industrial designers employ a variety of tools to think about and communicate three-dimensional product concepts. This unit introduces you to the skills and techniques needed to support design visualisation, focussing on analogue media, drawing skills and simple model making.

  • DNB305 Culture and Design

    An understanding of people and their cognitive and emotive relationship with the world is essential for designing responsive products and environments. This unit encourages a diversity of knowledge for you to gain a broader perspective of culture, and understand how issues of culture influence product design and the designer's interaction with society and diverse cultures. The content covered includes: theoretical perspectives of culture; psychological implications of everyday human-artefact interactivity; environmental and cultural perception; changing socio-cultural landscapes; ageing population; sustainability and globalisation; potential for design to advance social changes and quality of life; and psychological implications and attitudes embedded in product semantics and symbolics.

Interior design

  • DTB103 Interior Visualisation 1

    This unit introduces you to foundational visualisation and two-dimensional/three dimensional communication skills including drawing and rendering, technical drawing and model making relevant for (interior) design development and presentation.

  • DTB202 Interior Technology 1

    As part of your foundational year studies this unit will introduce you to the knowledge and skills necessary for communicating technical information to a project team. The application of these skills is a fundamental requirement for the practice of interior design and will prepare you for visual communication practices throughout your course.

  • DTB302 Colour Studies

    This unit develops advanced knowledge in the theory and application of colour, and its interdependence with light. It focuses on experimental research and design application of colour, relevant to design and design practice.

Landscape architecture

  • DLB100 Landscape Design 1

    This unit is your first landscape design studio, introducing you to foundational landscape design knowledge, skills, and applications. You will acquire these in stages, covering a range of design principles, theories and processes which you will apply to real or simulated design scenarios. The first stage is an immersion in, and familiarisation with, landscape's structural and compositional relationships and ways to interpret and express these. Next you will learn to apply basic design problem solving processes to articulate landscape design propositions in response to your interpretations. You will learn and experiment with design and discipline-specific language including application of the representational techniques you will learn in the co-requisite unit DLB103 Visualisation 1. This studio prepares you for the ongoing series of landscape design studio units.

  • DLB103 Landscape Visualisation 1

    This unit introduces you to foundational manual (non-digital) landscape visualisation skills and applications. Visualisation is the ability to imagine and give form to design ideas. Landscape designers work in four dimensions and thus employ a variety of tools to think about and communicate three- and four-dimensional ideas. This unit introduces you to the skills and techniques you'll need to support this design visualisation with a focus on analogue (non-digital) media, manual drawing skills and simple model making. You will learn and experiment with design and discipline-specific language including application of these representational techniques in the co-requisite unit DLB100. This pairing of units prepares you for the ongoing series of landscape design studio units.

  • DLB200 Landscape Design 2

    This unit is your second introductory level landscape design studio, building on the foundational knowledge, skills and applications you learnt in DLB100 and DLB103. In it you will explore landscape as an experiential, spatial and temporal expression of cultural meaning. You will experiment with the interpretation and design of landscape using your own body to 'read' local landscapes, and how they are culturally designated. You will experiment with design development processes and the language of landscape design to articulate new perceptions of landscape experiences, places, times and scales, and design propositions to transform the landscape. You will experiment with application of the representational techniques you will learn in DLB203 Landscape Visualisation 2. This studio prepares you for your second year, intermediate level design studios, beginning with DLB300.

  • DLB203 Landscape Visualisation 2

    This unit introduces you to foundational digital landscape visualisation skills and applications, and their integration with the manual skills and analogue media you worked with in DLB103. It draws on digital visualisation's realist and abstract properties to efficiently explore and express complex landscape ideas. The range of software available offers you a selection of methods to capture and rapidly explore the complex three-dimensional forms and ephemeral temporal processes (the fourth dimension) that characterise landscapes. You will learn and experiment with design and discipline-specific language including application of these representational techniques in the co-requisite unit DLB200 Landscape Design 2. This pairing of units prepares you for your second year, intermediate level design studios, beginning with DLB300.

  • DLB320 Landscape Horticulture

    This introductory level unit builds on the foundational knowledge of environmental sustainability you learnt in DEB100, and the knowledge, skills and applications you learnt in your first year core landscape architecture units. This unit introduces you to scientific, horticultural and planting design principles and the basic plant sciences (botany, ecology and horticulture) including: botanical nomenclature, morphology, plant forms, assemblages and systems, and plant cultivation requirements. You will apply this knowledge to develop and articulate sustainable site-based planting design propositions, and extend the communication techniques you learnt in DLB103 and DLB203 to learn the specific conventions of planting design communication. This unit prepares you for your first intermediate level landscape design studio DLB400 and further studies in environmental science in DLB420.

  • DLB325 People and Place

    This introductory level unit builds on the foundational knowledge of design history you learnt in DEB202. In it, you will explore theories of environment and behaviour, place-making and environmental psychology, including how people perceive and respond to landscapes both individually and collectively. You will learn about a wide range of foundational concepts developed from the 1960s to the present, regarding human interactions and relationships with the environment, essential to the formulation of sustainable landscape design propositions. You will explore and apply this knowledge in stages, including a site-specific project to develop your critical thinking and research skills. This unit extends the communication techniques you learnt in DEB100 to a wider range of written and visual methods of investigation and communication. It prepares you for further expansion of your intermediate level design understanding and skills in DLB400 and independent interpretation of the effects of past and present landscape designs in your third year unit DLB525.

  • DLB420 Landscape Systems

    This introductory level unit builds on the foundational knowledge of environmental sustainability you learnt in DEB100 and DLB320. In conjunction with the unit DLB400, you will explore theories of landscape ecology and regional ecosystems theory, with geomorphologic and human processes in landscape formation. Landscape architects need to understand the systems that create and are created by the landscape, and so this unit will develop your ability to comprehend the interconnectedness of landscape structures, systems, processes and developments, essential to the formulation of sustainable landscape design propositions. You will apply this knowledge in a semester long landscape study project, extending the communication techniques you learnt in DEB100 to learn the specific conventions of scientific reporting. This unit expands your understanding of landscape from a small site to a broad and holistic level, preparing you for expanding your intermediate level design skills in DLB500 and learning landscape planning theory and application in DLH700.

Property & planning

  • USB100 Understanding the Built Environment

    This unit exposes students to the various professions and concepts that determine, develop and manage the built environment and how the disciplines of construction management, quantity surveying, urban and regional planning and property economics interact to achieve an economic and sustainable built environment.

  • USB140 Imagine Property

    This unit introduces the underlying concepts of property and describes the various participants in the industry and how their roles interact to develop, acquire, value and dispose of residential property in both the public and private sector.  The unit will provide the foundations for further study in the property valuation, property law and property investment and finance units from primarily a residential perspective.  Interactive activities and assessment will be used to convey and test these fundamental property principles.

  • USB141 Building Big

    This unit builds on the construction fundamentals covered in the unit UXB110 Residential Construction and further develops these concepts and applies them to the construction methods, building area measurement and quality of design and construction for industrial property, retail centres, high rise commercial and high rise residential property. These concepts will provide the basis for the understanding of how construction type and quality are reflected in the market demand and value of these property types from a development, valuation and investment perspective.

  • USB241 Money and Wealth

    This unit provides the opportunity for you to learn basic accounting and investment principles within the context of the property industry.  You will also develop basic financial, cost and management accounting and financial management skills.  This unit will support you to conduct more advanced financial and statistical calculations in later valuation and property units and is complementary to units in market analysis and property investment analysis

  • UXB130 History of the Built Environment

    The unit looks at the interactions of forces and events that act to produce elements of the built environment, and the role played by the built environment in shaping human history through the use of historical examples from around the world.

  • UXB131 Imagine Planning and Design

    This unit, generally taken by first year students in QUT's Planning course, will introduce you to planning and design in urban and regional planning. You will learn about basic theories and practices of planning and design, planning policy and the planning profession.  This unit involves both individual and group work and you will also develop project management, research and communications skills necessary for professional practice.

  • UXB132 Urban Analysis

    The unit is structured to develop and apply the necessary skills for undertaking thorough analytical analyses of cities and regions. Theoretical and practical aspects of urban analysis including a variety of quantitative, qualitative and spatial analyses techniques are introduced during the lectures, where these techniques are then practiced during tutorials on the real-world projects.

  • UXB133 Urban Studies

    This unit introduces you to the various demographic, economic, social and physical aspects of our cities to help understand the nature of cities we live in. This unit builds upon the knowledge introduced in Imagine Planning and Design and Urban Analysis, and provides the theoretical foundation for application in studio type units in subsequent years.

  • UXB134 Land Use Planning

    This unit provides you with knowledge of and skills in land use planning and geographic information system (GIS) in an integrated way. This unit provides you with a balanced and clear introduction into the substantive domains of land use planning, one of the primary functions of planners. This unit builds on the academic skills learnt in USB100 - Understanding the Built Environment, UXB131 Imagine Planning and Design and UXB132 - Urban Analysis.

Units you need background knowledge to study

These units have requirements for previous study or background knowledge. Check the unit’s previous study requirements for details. If you have any questions, contact the unit coordinator for the semester you want to study.

If your previous studies were not in English, or were completed in a country where English is not the first language, you will also need to demonstrate that you meet our English proficiency requirements when you apply.

Architecture

  • DAB203 Architectural Visualisation 2

    The unit DAB103 introduced you to the skills and techniques needed to support design visualisation with a focus on analogue media and drawing skills. This unit continues that process of skills development, and integrates digital techniques (computer aided design) with analogue approaches; further developing your ability to imagine and test architectural designs through visual mean.

  • DAB210 Architectural Design 2

    This unit offers a focused introduction to the field of design through engagement with the explicit process of design as applied to architecture. It uses developmental exercises to enhance student perceptions of the built environment in a problem based learning environment. Architectural design as a manageable process in explored through a number of exercises and design projects. Discrete steps in the process of architectural design are made explicit through staged activities that build to a complete design project. Orthogonal drawing exercises, freehand sketching, presentation graphics, and model making all form part of the unit content. Teaching and learning activities are spread across lectures, tutorials, and studio based activities.

  • DAB310 Architectural Design 3

    This intermediate level unit in architectural design uses developmental exercises to enhance student perceptions of the built environment in a problem based learning environment. Design problems of increased complexity are tackled through a process of abstraction, experimentation, representation, imagination, and testing. Advanced orthogonal drawing, freehand sketching, presentation graphics, documentation techniques, and model making all form part of the unit content. Teaching and learning activities are spread across lectures, tutorials, workshops and studio based activities.

  • DAB403 Architectural Visualisation 3

    Architects recognise that visualisation or communication of process, decisions and outcomes is crucial. To date, you have learnt how to effectively communicate your architectural intentions using both analogue and digital means. However, the skills you have acquired have been primarily intended for the communication of design. For architects, the ability to communicate technical intentions is equally important. As such, this unit will equip you with technical communication and documentation skills using Building Information Modelling (BIM).

  • DAB410 Architectural Design 4

    This unit offers an intermediate level investigation into the field of design as applied to architecture. It uses developmental exercises to enhance student perceptions of the built environment in a problem based learning environment. Complex design problems deal with issues of social context, ethics, values, as well as the physical constraints of site, materials, climate, and technology. Design projects require the management of conflicting constraints to achieve optimal design proposals. Precedence, typologies, research and analysis, and representation techniques all form part of the unit content. Teaching and learning activities are spread across lectures, tutorials, and studio based activities.

  • DAB435 Architectural Technology 1

    The unit will explore various forms of domestic construction with particular reference to general properties of building materials, common construction practices used in dwellings, single storey and class 10 buildings. Comparison of building systems and their effect on domestic building design will be explored in detail. Students will be introduced to the construction aspects of the BCA including its housing provisions and associated codes for all types of buildings to assist to achieve the requirements for building approvals.

  • DAB511 Architectural Design 5

    This unit offers a focused intermediate level investigation into the field of design as applied to architecture. It uses developmental exercises to enhance student perceptions of the built environment in a problem based learning environment. A particular emphasis is placed on the introduction of knowledge and skills to effectively and professionally communicate the design intent with the aid of digitally mediated tools and methods while design theory, sustainability, sociology, history and critique, as they all apply to architectural design, all form part of the unit content. Design projects require synthesis of a range of abstract issues to achieve focused architectural proposals. Teaching and learning activities are spread across lectures, tutorials, and studio based activities.

  • DAB611 Architectural Design 6

    This unit will develop greater complexity in architectural design skills in an urban context with a focus on ethical and sustainable design solutions and practice. This requires the synthesis of issues, ideas, knowledge and techniques of architectural design as a holistic practice.

  • DAH525 Architecture and the City

    This unit aims to give a comprehensive overview of issues and techniques relevant to architectural design at an urban scale. Teaching and learning activities are spread across lectures, online activities and workshops.

  • DAH530 Integrated Technologies 2

    The aim of the structure segment of the unit is to familiarize students with the qualitative influences of structural systems on the design development of buildings. In particular the possibilities and limits of building structure are explored in relation to architectural intention through the use of exemplar. The aim of the construction segment is to familiarize students with various construction systems used in medium-rise commercial buildings. Here the emphasis is on the criteria to be used for the selection of appropriate systems and their associated materials.

  • DAH635 Architectural Technology 2

    It is a fundamental task of architectural design to achieve the comfort requirements of the users. This unit aims to promote students' understanding and awareness of the control of indoor conditions through the effective design and integration of building services. Students will participate in a simulated office practice, producing Building Code of Australia compliant construction documentation for low-rise buildings.

  • DAH710 Architectural Design 7

    This unit offers an advanced level investigation into the field of architectural design with particular focus on industrial buildings and workplaces. On completion of this unit you should be able to demonstrate: you understanding of building typologies and an awareness of the forces shaping their development; critical, analytical, and speculative research skills applicable to architectural projects; an ability to develop a reasoned position in relation to architectural issues, and to design from that position; and the application of knowledge and skills in architectural technology to the design process.

Design

  • DEH701 Research Methods

    This unit is a core unit common to architectural studies, landscape architecture, industrial design and interior design. The unit is project based and introduces students to research methods and methodologies that have relevance in design practice. It also provides a foundation for higher degree research. The content covered in this unit includes: • philosophical context of research in, of and through design • qualitative research incorporating methodologies and methods of relevance to design • research rigour and ethics • developing a research plan • literature searching and review • data gathering and analysis • research dissemination and reporting

Environmental systems

  • ENN544 Sustainable Practice in Engineering

    Sustainability has become a global agenda that impacts upon our work and everyday life.  The unit will introduce principles, challenges and skills for dealing with a diversity of trans-disciplinary issues in sustainable development.  By introducing critical sustainability theory and challenging best practices, this unit will prepare you for the impending changes that are necessary in all built environment and engineering disciplines.

  • EVB203 Geospatial Information Science

    This unit encourages spatial thinking by introducing geographic information sources, presentation and basic spatial data collection skills. It explores real world applications of geographical information technologies including GIS, remote sensing and global positioning system for scientific understanding of the environment. It builds on knowledge and skills from Ecosystems and the Environment (EVB102) or Earth Systems (ERB101) from first year.

  • EVB221 Remote Sensing of the Environment

    This unit provides a theoretical and practical introduction into remote sensing science and technologies applied for the acquisition of information about an object or phenomenon without making physical contact with the object. It explores the use of aerial sensor technologies to detect and classify objects on Earth by processing of electromagnetic radiation  emitted from aircraft or satellites.

  • EVB302 Environmental Pollution

    This unit deals with major problems of pollution of water, the land surface and the atmosphere. It covers processes responsible for the occurrence and release of pollutants in the environment, dispersion mechanisms, the hazards associated with different types of pollutant, accumulation of toxic substances, and procedures for the reduction of emissions and remediation of contaminated environments. It applies your learning from the Quantitative Skills in Environmental Science unit, EVB202 to assess and report on environmental pollution.

  • EVB304 Case Studies in Environmental Science

    This Capstone unit requires you to think critically about an important problem in environmental science and to integrate the knowledge gained through earlier units to provide an effective solution. You will evaluate a case study, applying your knowledge of quantitative techniques and experimental design, to address a specific environmental problem and present a practical solution. Through critical analysis and reflection on your work and that of your peers, you will gain a deeper understanding of the scientific method and its application to environmental science.

Industrial design

  • DNB203 Product Visualisation 2

    This unit continues developing your analogue media and drawing skills gained in DNB101 Industrial Design 1 and introduces digital and analogue approaches and visualisation techniques to support your industrial design projects.

Interior design

  • DTB101 Interior Design 1

    This unit introduces you to knowledge, skills and application of design concepts and processes relevant to interior design at a foundational level.

  • DTB201 Interior Design 2

    This unit further develops your knowledge, skills and application for interior design at a foundational level. It links with work previously undertaken in DTB101 and DTB103 and prepares you for subsequent interior design units.

  • DTB203 Interior Visualisation 2

    This unit advances the knowledge that you learnt in DTB103 Interior Visualisation 1, focussing on integrating digital and analogue media to visualise and communicate design ideas and proposals.

  • DTB301 Interior Design 3

    This unit further develops your knowledge, skills and application in regards to the person-environment relationship and the implications for spatial design, as well as extending your knowledge of design process. In DTB301 you will investigate the fundamental aspects of transition, interiority, building character, site context, and materiality in relation to interior design practice and associated fields through the refurbishment of an existing one-storey building. It links to the work previously undertaken in DTB101, DTB201, and DTB203, and prepares you to undertake more complex interior design projects and collaborative design process in DTB401.

  • DTB401 Interior Design 4

    This unit further develops your knowledge, skills and application in regards to the person-environment relationship, and the implications for dual-function, sensory spatial design, as well as building on foundational design processes. In DTB401 you will investigate the fundamental aspects of immersion (Space/time 4th dimension, Reverie, Presence and Phenomenology) and Interaction (Participation, Experience, Responsibility, Inclusivity and Activism) in relation to interior design practice and associated fields through the experimentation of model making and the refurbishment of an existing two-storey building with vertical circulation.  It links to the work previously undertaken in DTB101, DTB201, DTB301 and DTB203, and prepares you to undertake more complex interior design projects in DTB501.

  • DTB403 Design Psychology

    Drawing on environmental psychology relevant to spatial design, this unit provides the theoretical and analytical resources to enable you to identify the ways in which the individual and the built environment interact, influencing behaviour and experience. Located in the second year of the course, the unit complements the socio-cultural aspects of design addressed in the third year unit DTB502 Design in Society providing core theoretical and technical knowledge to support intermediate and advanced design learning.

  • DTB501 Interior Design 5

    This unit further develops your knowledge, skills and application for interior design through project based real world issues and contexts.  It links to the work previously undertaken in DTB 401.

  • DTB504 Design in Society

    This unit provides theoretical and analytical resources to enable you to identify the way the designed world intersects with social life. These insights are crucial to the capacity of design to respond to the way the designed world is lived and experienced. This unit will 1) review theories and case studies to illuminate the relationships between design and everyday practice across cultures and time, and 2) provide an opportunity to apply these insights in an analysis of a contemporary designed environment. Located in the 3rd year of your course, Design in Society provides valuable resources for design practice in other units as it develops concepts and processes suited to the emphasis in the latter years of the course - not just on problem solving - but on problem framing and conceptualisation. With its emphasis on socio-cultural aspects of design, Design in Society complements the more psychological emphasis of the unit, DTB403 Design Psychology.

  • DTH601 Interior Design 6

    This unit further develops your knowledge, skills and application for interior design through more complex project based real world issues and contexts.  It links to the work previously undertaken in DTB501 and DTB502 prepares you for the final year of the course.

  • DTH603 Furniture Studies

    This unit develops at an intermediate course level your knowledge, skills and their application regarding furniture and joinery in the interior and exterior context with a specific focus on experimental design and prototype construction. It builds upon the technical issues introduced in the units DTB202 and DTB303.

Landscape architecture

  • DLB300 Landscape Design 3

    This intermediate level landscape design studio unit builds on the foundational knowledge, skills and applications you learnt in first year, and in DLB325. In it you will explore theories of environment and behaviour, place-making and environmental psychology, including how people perceive and respond to landscapes both individually and collectively, building on your understanding of landscape as a cultural expression developed in DLB200. You will engage in the application of these theories for systematic landscape appraisal and design development to articulate sustainable site-based design propositions. You will further develop your application of the representational techniques learnt in DLB103 and DLB203, consolidating the details of landscape design communication conventions as well as experimentation. This studio prepares you for the consolidation of your intermediate level design skills in DLB400.

  • DLB400 Landscape Design 4

    This intermediate level landscape design studio unit consolidates the introductory knowledge, skills and applications learnt in your course so far. In conjunction with DLB420, you will explore design theories and processes related to urban ecology including human processes in landscape formation. You will apply these in the appraisal and design of site-based landscape propositions, including their sustainable integration into wider landscape systems such as the movement and exchange of people, capital, services, water and energy. This unit will build on the understanding of the complexities of landscape you have developed through your learning to date, and consolidate your landscape design development and communication skills, preparing you for further expansion of your intermediate level design skills in DLB500.

  • DLB500 Landscape Design 5

    This final intermediate level landscape design studio unit builds on the knowledge, skills and applications consolidated in DLB400. In conjunction with DLB525, you will explore design theories and processes related to interactions between society (including culture, economy and technology) and the environment, placing an emphasis on developing landscape speculations which address sustainability in cultural and biophysical landscape contexts. Your learning will involve the rigorous testing of design ideas against the constraints of selected landscapes and briefs. You will develop and test a philosophical basis for design exploration, engaging with experimental design processes and self-directed research. This unit shifts your learning toward greater design complexity and independent application and development of your communication skills. It prepares you to engage with advanced level landscape design in DLH600.

  • DLH600 Landscape Design 6

    This is your first advanced level landscape design studio unit, and your first 24 credit point unit in the 4-year landscape architecture course. As such, it unites two of landscape architecture's core study areas - Landscape Design up to DLB500, and Landscape Technology / Construction in DLB240 and DLB440. DLH600 unites and builds on the principles and processes learnt in these units in a program of advanced design resolution through the development of technical documents commensurate with those produced by the profession for landscape construction contractors. This unit shifts your learning toward greater creative and technical design specificity and independent application, providing a solid foundation for the critical and creative complexity and independence required in your final year landscape design studios beginning with DLH700.

  • DLH700 Landscape Design 7

    This advanced level 24 credit point landscape design studio unit builds on the knowledge, skills and applications developed in your landscape architecture core units to date. In it you will explore advanced theory in landscape planning to help you conceptualise the complex social and environmental issues and policy frameworks that inform land development, and the related design and planning theories and processes such as those emerging through landscape urbanism. In a sustained, semester-long project you will engage with a large scale site and associated complex problems of planning, design and management, and independently formulate innovative and sustainable landscape planning and design propositions and implementation strategies. This unit shifts your learning toward greater complexity and independent application of advanced skills in the generation of detailed communication and presentation techniques commensurate with professional-level landscape architectural investigation and practice. The following semester unit DLH800 will build on these skills in your capstone landscape project.

  • DLH800 Landscape Design 8

    This 24 credit point capstone landscape design unit invites you to explore and demonstrate an advanced individual expression of the knowledge, skills and applications developed in your landscape architecture core units to date. You will undertake a sustained, semester-long thesis-style project at an advanced conceptual and schematic landscape design level, based on substantial independent research and rigorous design development. Understanding landscape architecture as a contextual and relational discipline, you will formulate innovative and sustainable landscape planning and design propositions and implementation strategies to balance competing social, cultural, economic, and ecological constraints and opportunities. This unit substantiates your independent skills in professional-level landscape architectural investigation and practice enabling you to engage with the wide range of projects you will encounter in your professional life.

  • DLH845 Professional Practice in Landscape Architecture

    This capstone unit builds on understandings of legal and regulatory environment in which landscape architects operate. Design practice requires the understanding and adherence to a range of ethical, cultural, business and legal concerns and requirements.  This unit provides you with the knowledge to understand and participate in professional design practice by introducing key issues in the design professions, including: the organisation and roles of the regulatory and professional bodies governing the professions; the cultural and legal context for contemporary design practice; essential skills in consultancy and construction contracts; and the ethical values and attitudes which govern professional practice. An emphasis on integrated scholarship and collaborative links with other professions will build your capacity and resilience as you transition from life as a university student to life as a beginning professional.

Property & planning

  • USB240 Market Analysis

    This unit builds upon the foundation property, valuation and economic units from your first year studies.  You will apply demographic, economic and key urban economic theories and policies in the property market environment.  Understanding property markets will assist in the creation of marketing and investment strategies to meet targeted consumer supply and demand.  You will conduct property market research and interpret the outcomes from research publications.

  • USB242 Experience Property

    This unit builds upon the preliminary property fundamentals covered in the unit USB140 Imagine Property, expanding those key concepts to income producing and investment grade assets.  This unit develops an understanding of the various commercial market sectors and how various features of these markets impact on the value of a property asset.  The unit will provide the foundations for the further study in the property valuation, property law and property investment and finance units from a commercial property perspective.  Interactive activities and assessment will be used to convey these fundamental income producing property principles.

  • USB243 Property Legislation

    A practicing property professional and property valuer needs a good understanding of several areas of property related legislation as it applies to property transactions and property practice to be able to manage and avoid risk, identify property and valuation legal issues as they arise and identify when specialised legal counsel is necessary.  This unit focuses on extending and applying the theoretical knowledge obtained in Experience Property and Urban Development Law to explore how Commonwealth and State legislation is applied to property practice and property transactions, with particular focus on statutory valuation and property acquisition and resumption. The unit covers areas of property rights, contract, agency, statutory valuation, consumer protection and dispute resolution as applicable to a practicing property professional in Queensland.

  • USB244 Asset Performance

    With an increasing number of companies and institutions now leasing and investing in property the management of these assets is becoming a crucial aspect of business practice and investment performance.  This unit will cover the physical and financial aspects of commercial, retail and industrial property management and the role of property as a strategic real estate asset and its role in a diversified investment portfolio.  The area of corporate real estate and asset management will be covered in the unit

  • USB245 Property Investment Analysis

    Property analysts are required to analyse property as an investment and provide investment recommendations.  This involves a close scrutiny of property investment options, and selection of the most appropriate option given the investor's preferences, goals and market conditions.  This unit provides the basis to enable the property analyst to examine the property's investment worth over time using discounted cashflow techniques, including an introduction to the effect of financing and tax considerations, risk and return and comparison against investment objectives.

  • USB246 Transaction Process

    The buying and selling of property is a critical point in any property development, valuation or property investment. This unit provides you with an understanding of the transaction process in respect to acquisition, contract negotiation, due diligence, taxation considerations, legal structuring, sales and/or lease negotiation, compliance with relevant legislation and settlement. It demonstrates the relevance and interaction of units such as property valuation, investment analysis, market analysis, property law and planning in all property transactions.

  • USB300 Property Development

    This unit brings together concepts gained on strategic evaluation, risk, organisational structure, planning, construction and development feasibility analysis. It places this knowledge in a total project context and provides students with an understanding of the processes involved in property development  from conception to completion and beyond.

  • USB341 Money and Property

    Property is a major asset class of all available investment options.  Due to its distinct characteristics, debt and equity financing plays a major role in investment decisions.  As such, this unit further develops students' understanding of property investment and financing techniques and the place of property assets within the capital markets.  This unit covers the financing of a range of asset types including residential, income producing, development and property funds.

  • USB342 Property Software

    This unit introduces students to a range of industry-standard property software products.  Students will gain knowledge in the operation of a variety of industry specific software for the analysis and management of a range of property types.  Students will develop their competency in using these products, as well as skills in the analysis of the outcomes generated, using the property software as a decision making tool to support investment recommendations.  This capability will help students to prepare their readiness to work in the industry. This unit is an advanced unit that builds upon the skills and knowledge you developed in USB245 Property Investment Analysis and it links with USB300 Property Development.

  • USB343 Boutique Valuations

    This is the capstone valuation unit  and applies the valuation principles and procedures developed in the units USB140, Imagine Property,  and USB242, Experience Property, to the more complex property classes such as rural property, special premises, retail and business based property that require a greater level of student expertise for analysis and value calculation.  Assessment items will provide students with the opportunity to undertake practical valuation exercises to link this unit with the property knowledge and valuation principles developed throughout their studies.

  • UXB230 Site Planning

    The objective of this unit is for you to learn, practice and apply site planning processes, techniques and skills on a selected project site. Topics include information retrieval, site appraisal and analysis techniques, constructive critique, and presentation skills.

  • UXB231 Planning Processes

    You will study the logic, role and methods of successive stages of planning including aims, information analysis and synthesis, evaluation, strategy development, monitoring and review. You will learn how to integrate widespread consultation both within communities and with other professionals to help develop flexible and widely applicable planning processes.

  • UXB232 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution

    This unit introduces you to the theory and practice of negotiation and conflict resolution. In this unit you will acquire skills in effective communication, analysis of disputes and creative problem solving through active participation in role playing activities and intense investigation of real world conflicts that arise through the development of land. While it links to a previous unit in planning processes undertaken by students in the planning course, students from other fields will be able to participate fully in the unit. This unit prepares students for negotiations implicit in the more complex group projects undertaken in the third and fourth years of study, as well as for early career professional practice.

  • UXB233 Planning Law

    This unit provides the understanding of the basic political, policy, and legislation essential for planning professionals, whether they work in the public or the private sector. This unit provides important professional context and grounding in urban policy development, implementation, development assessment, and evaluation.

  • UXB330 Urban Design

    This unit develops skills in urban design analysis and communication. You will learn, practice and applytechniques and knowledge required to produce urban design plans and policies.

  • UXH331 Environmental Analysis and Planning

    This unit increases your understanding of environmental analysis and planning issues, policies, and methods, aiming to prepare you for incorporation of environmental objectives and constraints in professional practice. In this unit you will engage in dialogues on contemporary environmental dilemmas, exploring ethical and practical aspects which underpin conflict. You will further refine skills acquired in site analysis units by learning to create and modify spatial models to facilitate collaborative problem-solving. These skills will aid in preparations for final year planning studio units as well as professional practice.

  • UXH430 Planning Theory and Ethics

    This unit will introduce you to ethical and planning theory. Classical theories in ethics provide an essential foundation to planning practice. Planning theory offers an insight into different justifications of how and why we work as planners.

  • UXH431 Urban Planning Practice

    This unit is designed to develop and apply analysis, synthesis, problem-solving, and policy formulation skills to strategically plan the development of a local government area or a neighbourhood. Contemporary planning techniques are introduced during the lectures, where these techniques are then applied during tutorials on the real-world projects.

  • UXH432 Community Planning

    Students gain information on the many issues involved in community planning, including affordable housing, environmental quality and design, employment, human services, community access and culture. They learn to recognize the impacts of social and physical change on communities at scales varying from the local to the global. Building on knowledge and skills acquired earlier in the course, they formulate policies and develop solutions involving community consultation and conflict resolution to link government policies to local action.

  • UXH433 Regional Planning

    You will learn to focus and apply material from a wide range of disciplines and locations to understand and develop current regional and metropolitan policy and apply the knowledge of policy formulation and skills of analysis and synthesis to real world problem-solving at a scale which is larger than a single local government.