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Overview

We combine biology, medicine, engineering and physics to design and develop new equipment and methods that improve the quality of human health and life.

Practitioners in these fields design everything from surgical devices, prosthetics and artificial organs to systems for medical monitoring, radiation therapy, patient monitoring and diagnosing disease.

Biomedical engineers and medical physicists have developed life-saving technologies that have made enormous advancements in healthcare and the quality of people's lives.

Real students

"When a family member received a cochlear implant I saw how medical engineering could provide a long-term solution to his hearing loss. I would love a career working to improve the health of individuals through the development and implementation of viable healthcare technology."

Renee Nightingale

Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) (Medical)

Research

Our discipline comprises of multidisciplinary researchers and educators who apply their skills in biology, chemistry, physics, engineering and medicine to solve medical problems.

We focus our investigations on the musculoskeletal system. We have surgeons as members of our discipline, to inform and lead our research.

We conduct research in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, where we develop biomaterials and manufacturing technologies that work to regenerate tissues such as bone, cartilage and breast.

Key areas for analysis of native and engineered tissues include biomechanics and imaging. We have significant capacity and expertise in biomechanical studies from the molecular to organ level.

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Biofabrication and Tissue Morphology

The Biofabrication and Tissue Morphology group is a world class multi-disciplinary research team focused on embedding biofabrication into routine clinical use.

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Biomechanics and Spine Research Group

QUT Biomechanics and Spine Research Group conducts research with the goal of improving the current treatments and understanding of spine disorders.

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Materials Science and Engineering

Materials Science and Engineering investigates how to characterise and analyse existing materials and to design and optimise new materials.

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Projects

Smart Matrix™ approaches towards neo vascularisation in bone repair

Project leader

Associate Professor Mia Woodruff

Dates

2013-2016

Project summary

Bone injuries cost Australia more than $1 billion annually. The development of a medical device combining novel pro-angiogenic technology, Smart Matrix™, with polymer scaffolds for treatment of bone defects by this project, will facilitate rapid development of a blood supply within the defect, aiding bone growth and reducing overall costs compared to current treatments.

A novel electrospraying technology platform for controlled and targeted growth factor delivery

Project leader

Associate Professor Mia Woodruff

Dates

2013-2016

Project summary

This project will develop a new growth factor delivery strategy to stimulate bone regeneration. The project will utilise the technique of electrospraying to create small dissolving polymer microspheres containing bone-relevant growth factors, which are released gradually as the polymer degrades after implantation into a bone defect site to promote healing.

A preclinical humanised chimeric model to investigate novel therapeutic strategies against breast cancer bone metastasis

Project leader

Professor Dietmar Hutmacher

Dates

2015-2017

Interdisciplinary and inter-institution projects

Antibacterial impact assessment of nanopillar surfaces on titanium implants

Project leaders
Dates

2018-2020

Project summary

This project aims to further understand the bactericidal properties of nano-pillared/textured surfaces, onto orthopaedic implants. It will do so by mimicking the nano-pillar structures derived from cicada wings by using Helium ion microscopy (HIM) and also Hydro Thermal techniques. The project also aims to study the physical mechanisms of the fracture of bacteria using numerical modelling.

This project will result in new generation implants with minimal bacterial infection that could result in cost savings to the Australian healthcare, improved quality of life in aged population, and may lead to the establishment of new implant industry sector in Australia.

Novel multiscale model to investigate mechanical properties of cartilage

Project leaders
Dates

2018-2020

Project summary

This project aims to develop a new multiscale model to investigate anisotropic and inhomogeneous mechanical properties of cartilage. It has been found that the mechanical properties of cartilage highly depend on its microstructures and components. The new model is proposed based on a new constitutive relation in the macroscale and a novel algorithm to obtain local stress distributions in the microscale as well as through rigorous experimental validations.

This model will be a powerful tool to understand cartilage mechanical properties. It will accelerate the design of mechanically viable artificial cartilage biomaterial, which will provide significant economic benefits and place Australia in the forefront of modelling and biomaterials.

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Partnerships

Our researchers collaborate on projects in specialised research groups and facilities across disciplines and institutions.

Some of our industry and community partners have included:

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Our topics

Are you looking to study at a higher or more detailed level? We are currently looking for students to research topics at a variety of study levels, including PhD, Masters, Honours or the Vacation Research Experience Scheme (VRES).
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Our experts

We host an expert team of researchers and teaching staff, including Head of School and discipline leaders. Our discipline brings together a diverse team of experts who deliver world-class education and achieve breakthroughs in research.

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