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Green polymer-inorganic composite materials

Composite materials are widely researched and widely used in applications such as aircraft, automobiles, ships, structural components and even the space industry.There is a need to create new composite materials which are environmentally friendly and do not use fossil fuel based products. Moreover, the properties of the composites need to be improved while at the same time minimising the costs involved.Consequently our research group is working on composite materials which not only include inexpensive inorganic fillers from the mining sector …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering

Value-adding waste materials

Many industries generate copious amounts of waste products.Of particular interest are those wastes generated by the mining sector as typically a large fraction of the ore bodies are dumped or the agricultural sector.Potential solutions we are investigating include:converting aluminosilicate waste to zeolitestransforming inorganic waste to catalyst materialscreation of materials for water and wastewater treatmentmaking activated carbonrenewable fuels,

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering

3D Bioprinting in Cancer Research

Interested in 3D Bioprinting? Care about improving our understanding of cancer pathogenesis? Then this opportunity is for you!   The Queensland University of Technology (QUT) and industry partner Gelomics Pty Ltd are seeking competitive candidates to apply for a PhD scholarship (AU $34,013 per annum) in 3D Bioprinting & Cancer Research. 

Study level
PhD
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering

Understanding and manipulating bacterial motility for infection control

The recent COVID 19 pandemic reminds us of how difficult it is to control infectious diseases. Pathogenic microorganisms are known to be extremely 'smart' and are able to quickly develop mechanisms against most of our strategies aimed at eradicating them. Our group is focused on bacterial infections to implants and medical devices. We are in the pursuit to outsmart the bacteria to develop the next generation medical device and implant materials.Bacterial motility/movement and group-coordination on surfaces and in 3-dimensional environment …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

Comparison of output from collocated solar systems of different technology

Solar panel efficiency is calculated using standardised testing conditions, allowing like-for-like comparison of systems under the same conditions. However, data collected over a three year period from two collocated solar systems of different technologies are showing unexpected results. The most efficient system's yearly output is comparatively lower. Initial data analysis explains some differences from the operational conditions, but further investigation is required.

Study level
Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering
Research centre(s)

Centre for Clean Energy Technologies and Practices

Control of concentrating solar thermal power plants

Concentrating solar power (CSP) is a technology that utilises mirrors (heliostats) to focus the sun’s rays on a solar receiver. This provides heat for a power generation cycle, creating thermal energy.Control of the heat transfer fluid temperature in the solar receiver is crucial for the efficient use/storage of thermal energy and to minimise the degradation of the receiver. The aim of this project is to design controllers for the heat transfer fluid pumps and the heliostats using a previously developed model of the receiver's thermodynamics.

Study level
Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering

Understanding the structure-property relationships in reduced graphene oxide hydrogels

Graphene consists of hybridised carbon atoms in a hexagonal two-dimensional (2D) lattice. This material has extraordinary mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. However, one problem in practical applications is the aggregation and restacking between neighbouring graphene layers.In contrast, a possible way to avoid this problem is by transforming 2D graphene sheets into graphene hydrogel (GH) consisting of a three dimensional (3D) porous structure. Recently, 3D GH has been widely investigated in energy storage and conversion, catalysis and sensors. Furthermore, its accessible …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering
Research centre(s)
Centre for Materials Science
Centre for Clean Energy Technologies and Practices

An airway chip for screening viral infection mediated immune responses

Respiratory infections such as influenza, SARS-COV-2, COVID-19, and MERS are increasingly prevalent. Complications and related deaths arising from these infections are often the result of a “cytokine storm”, whereby there is an over production of proinflammatory soluble factors by immune cells, which dictates symptoms severity and mortality risk. Recent works showed that immunomodulatory therapy, with or without antiviral agents, may improve recovery outcome. However, the screening of suitable immune-modulatory and antiviral agents relies heavily on animal models which can't capture …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering

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