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Found 95 matching student topics

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Food literacy projects (see description for options)

Food Literacy is a collection of knowledge, skills and behaviours required to plan, manage, select, prepare and eat foods to meet needs and determine food intake. It is the scaffolding that empowers individuals, households, communities or nations to protect diet quality through change and strengthen dietary resilience over time. Areas for further research include, but are not limited to:identifying models to integrated food literacy into dietetic practice e.g. through the Nutrition Care Processdevelop population level indicators for food literacy that …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences

Novel therapeutic strategies to treat advanced colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is a very common disease, with over 15,000 new cases diagnosed in Australia annually. Metastatic colorectal cancer describes advanced disease that has spread beyond the primary site. This is very aggressive and incurable in the vast majority of these patients. To improve outcomes for colorectal cancer, we are using cutting edge genomic and cell biology techniques to understand disease heterogeneity and optimise drug response. We are developing novel therapeutic interventions based on unique molecular signatures and are testing …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Model predictive control of connected vehicle platoons

Control of connected vehicle platoons can ensure the swift movement of traffic through a city by sharing vehicles' states and desired actuation. This networked control design can alleviate traffic jams, reduce vehicle emissions, and reduce fuel usage through improved aerodynamics. Model Predictive Control algorithms are a natural solution to address constraints arising from both communications and system dynamics. A key challenge is to design distributed control algorithms that are robust to disturbances in the environment and to stochastic information from …

Study level
PhD
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Electrical Engineering and Robotics

Mathematical modelling of regime shifts in Antarctica (PhD scholarship)

This fully-funded PhD project provides an exciting opportunity to develop new mathematical models and theory for ecological regime shifts in Antarctica. Expertise in mathematical modelling using ordinary and/or partial differential equations will be a major advantage for the success of this project. Subject to COVID-19 restrictions, there will also be an opportunity to travel to Antarctica to visit the ecosystems you will be modelling.This PhD project is part of a multi-university research program "Securing Antarctica's Environmental Future" . Through this …

Study level
PhD
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Mathematical Sciences
Research centre(s)
Centre for Data Science
Centre for the Environment

Overcoming the challenges of sensitive data via synthetic data generation (case study)

In the 21st Century, there is an abundance of data, often containing insights that could benefit a number of stakeholders. However, despite this opportunity, it is often the case that the data is sensitive and can not be released by organisations or government agencies due to privacy concerns. One possible solution to the above dilemma is to instead carefully construct a 'twin' data set that contains similar information (and ideally, the same insights) as the original data set, but without …

Study level
Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Mathematical Sciences
Research centre(s)
Centre for Data Science

Optimising delivery of a novel nose-to-brain treatment for brain cancer

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive brain cancer with no curative treatment and poor prognosis. One of the biggest challenges with treating GBM is the inability of treatment to cross the blood-brain barrier resulting in poor drug distribution in the brain. Fortunately, scientists have recently developed a novel nose-to-brain delivery system that uses nanoparticles loaded with a chemotherapy drug called paclitaxel. Initial treatment investigations in vivo are showing significant promise in reducing and controlling the tumour burden. While exciting, before …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Mathematical Sciences

Using mathematics to understand multiple sclerosis: what causes the immune system to attack the brain?

Every day, we use our bodies to move, think, talk and eat, but for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) these tasks can be virtually impossible. MS is a chronic disease which develops because the immune system has started to attack the nerve cells in the brain. This causes the degradation of parts of the brain and irreversible impairment in physical and mental activity. Unfortunately, this disease has no cure, and while considerable therapeutic advances against this disease have been achieved, …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Mathematical Sciences

Monte-Carlo modelling in radiotherapy

Various research projects are available in the use of monte-carlo techniques in radiotherapy and medical imaging. These include modelling radiotherapy linear accelerators, radiobiology, patient dosimetric verification and in-vivo treatment verification using electronic portal imaging devices.span

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Chemistry and Physics
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

Optimal conservation management in uncertain Antarctic environments

Species and ecosystems in Antarctica are threatened. Optimal biodiversity conservation is an interdisciplinary field combining mathematical modelling and optimisation with ecology and conservation. We can use mathematics to understand the system, model how management actions might impact it, and then optimise which actions should be used. For example, we can explore where protected areas should be placed, how species should be managed, or how tourist impacts should be reduced. However, the complexities of conservation in Antarctica necessitate the application of …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Mathematical Sciences
Research centre(s)
Centre for Data Science
Centre for the Environment

Modelling and managing uncertain Antarctic species networks

Antarctic ecosystems are complex, and data is limited since it is expensive to collect. Species including penguins, seabirds, invertebrates, mosses, and marine species interact in food webs which can be modelled as mathematical networks. These networks can be large, span across terrestrial and marine systems, and are changing in response to environmental changes.These ecological networks can be modelled using differential equation predator prey models like Lotka-Volterra to describe these interactions. However, the relationships between species are not always known, or …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Mathematical Sciences
Research centre(s)
Centre for Data Science
Centre for the Environment

Calendering lithium-ion battery electrodes: just roll with it

Calendering is the process of compressing and smoothing out a material by passing it between two rollers. This is a critical step of manufacturing thin films for energy storage and other applications, but one that can often be overlooked at a research level.This project will investigate the effect of calandering on electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries. The aim is to find the optimum amount calendaring for maximum film quality and performance.

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Chemistry and Physics
Research centre(s)
Centre for Materials Science
Centre for Clean Energy Technologies and Practices

Modelling and managing uncertain Antarctic species networks

Antarctic ecosystems are complex, and data is limited since it is expensive to collect. Species interact in food webs which can be modelled as mathematical networks. The relationships between species are not always known, or we might know they interact but not how strongly. Noisy (or imperfect) data can be used to model these species interactions to give more certainty about how the ecosystem works as a whole – although the worse the data is, the less information it contributes. …

Study level
Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Mathematical Sciences
Research centre(s)
Centre for Data Science
Centre for the Environment

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