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Interaction between pollen proteases and ACE2 receptor of SARS-CoV-2

Pollen allergy is a common seasonal respiratory disease triggered by hypersensitivity to pollen affecting 10-30% of adults and 40% of children, and is a predisposing factor for asthma. Pollens interact with airway epithelium to both stimulate innate immunity and elicit an adaptive immune response.Proteolytic activity is one route that stimulates release of alarmins and pro-inflammatory cytokines from mucosal epithelia. Previous studies have found the expression of Serine/Cysteine (Ser/Cys) proteases in some types of grass pollen grains, but it is not …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Defining human immune responses to a healthy gut microbiome

Many human diseases are thought to involve interactions between the gut microbiome and the immune system which shape the nature and function of immunity. These interactions between host and environment are thought to be critical regulators of health and disease.In autoimmune diseases many studies have associated presence or absence of particular microbial species with diseases and some studies have shown influence of disease-related genetics on the composition of the gut microbiome. However, no studies to date have formally addressed the …

Study level
PhD
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Centre for Microbiome Research

An airway chip for screening viral infection mediated immune responses

Respiratory infections such as influenza, SARS-COV-2, , and MERS are increasingly prevalent. Complications and related deaths arising from these infections are often the result of a “cytokine storm”, whereby there is an over production of proinflammatory soluble factors by immune cells, which dictates symptoms severity and mortality risk [1]. Recent works showed that immunomodulatory therapy with or without antiviral agents may improve recovery outcome. However, the screening of suitable immune-modulatory and antiviral agents relies heavily on animal models which cannot …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

An airway chip for screening viral infection mediated immune responses

Respiratory infections such as influenza, SARS-COV-2, COVID-19, and MERS are increasingly prevalent. Complications and related deaths arising from these infections are often the result of a “cytokine storm”, whereby there is an over production of proinflammatory soluble factors by immune cells, which dictates symptoms severity and mortality risk. Recent works showed that immunomodulatory therapy, with or without antiviral agents, may improve recovery outcome. However, the screening of suitable immune-modulatory and antiviral agents relies heavily on animal models which can't capture …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering

Protein biomarkers to predict immunotherapy response in lung cancers

Immunotherapy has revolutionised cancer treatment in the recent years. It has been successfully used to treat several melanoma and lung cancer patients. However, not all patients respond to immunotherapy. There is a clinical need for biomarkers that can identify lung cancer patients that are most likely to benefit from immunotherapy.In this project, we will employ mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches to carry out proteomic profiling of mononuclear cells and plasma samples from lung cancer patients treated with immunotherapy. Proteome profiles of …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

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