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Simulating multiphase flow in gradient porous media using invasion percolation

Research on immiscible flow in a heterogeneous porous media has been an active area of research, particularly due to its close relationship with hydrology and petroleum engineering. Specifically, the modelling of oil migration and non-aqueous phase liquid migration in groundwater is a major challenge due to the multi-scale heterogeneous nature of the porous media.In this project we will develop efficient numerical method to simulate the fluid-fluid displacement process in porous media with a gradient in grain size, and gain fundamental …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering

GPU acceleration for the lattice Boltzmann method

The lattice Boltzmann method has recently gained popularity for modelling complex fluid​ dynamics including in microfluidics and bio-engineering. The method is computationally expensive, especially for 3D calculations.The aim of this project is to benchmark the open-source TCLB code for the Lattice Boltzmann method against the codes currently used here at QUT to model flow phenomena. We particularly want to leverage the GPU capabilities of the TCLB code to reduce computational time.

Study level
Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering

Modelling convection in porous media

When liquids of different densities mix, they can produce complex fingering patterns. This is particularly important in the flow of liquid in underground porous aquifers, where the density of the groundwater can be influenced by salinity or heat, as well as the insulation properties of porous materials. Another important application is the still-prototypical use of aquifers for carbon sequestration; the dissolution of CO2 into groundwater has a complex effect on its density, and convective mixing is crucial for accelerating the …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Mathematical Sciences

Contact line dynamics and healing liquid films

One of the more challenging aspects of modelling fluid dynamics is the contact-line problem: how does a contact line (a junction between two different fluids and a solid) move over time? A variety of models exist, such as disjoining pressure models, Navier slip models, and the imposition of a prewetting film, to name a few.In this project we will explore the behaviour of these different contact line models in the context of closing or healing liquid films. A hole in …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Mathematical Sciences

Image-based computational model to predict intracranial aneurysm rupture

Intracranial aneurysms are bulging, weak areas of an artery that supply blood to the brain which are relatively common. While most aneurysms do not show symptoms, 1% spontaneously rupture which can be fatal or it can leave the survivor with permanent disabilities. This catastrophic outcome has motivated surgeons to operate on approximately 30% of aneurysms despite their rate of complications arising and cost of operation.The impact of aneurysm morphology on blood flow shear stress and rupture could educate surgical decision-making …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

Image-based assessment of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability: Towards a computational tool for early detection and prediction

Plaque characteristics and local haemodynamic/mechanical forces keep changing during plaque progression and rupture. Quantifying these changes and discovering the progression-stress correlation can improve our understanding of plaque progression/rupture. This will lead to a quantitative assessment tool for early detection of vulnerable plaques and prediction of possible ruptures. Our research project aims to combine medical imaging, computational modelling, phantom experiments and pathological analysis to investigate plaque progression and vulnerability to rupture in both animal models and patients with carotid stenosis. We …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

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