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Redox flow batteries and ion-exchange membranes

Grid-scale energy storage for intermittent renewables like solar and wind is an essential element of the transition away from fossil fuel based electricity production. Redox flow batteries have some very interesting characteristics for this stationary storage application:they are safer than other battery typesthe amount of energy stored can typically be scaled up easilythe power and energy of a system are more decoupled compared to lithium and other batteries, making them flexible in their design parameters.An important part of the redox …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Chemistry and Physics

Low cost, long life metal-ion capacitors and supercapacitors for renewable energy storage

Australia boasts rich wind and solar energy resources. To avoid fluctuations placing severe burden on the power grids, a reliable and efficient battery storage is required.The present technology based on lithium-ion batteries suffers from high manufacturing cost, poor safety and short life-span.A new kind of storage devices, metal-ion capacitors (MICs), are expected to overcome the storage and the charging speed of the traditional batteries in the near future, opening new avenues for renewable energy resources. The basic structure of MICs …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Chemistry and Physics
Research centre(s)
Centre for Materials Science

Development composite electrode for next generation Li-ion batteries

Australia is rich in lithium battery materials and is poised to be the world leader in sustainable energy storage. The rapid growth in the automobile and energy sector created greater demand for high-performance Li-ion batteries with high energy density. Conventional Li-ion batteries utilise a graphite anode with a limited theoretical capacity. Therefore, we need to develop alternative electrode materials with high energy density and a longer lifespan.Silicon (Si) has received attention owing to its high specific capacity at ambient temperature. …

Study level
PhD
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering
Research centre(s)
Centre for Materials Science

Safe and non-flammable electrolytes for batteries

Electrolytes play a significant role in determining the performance of energy storage devices. In general, different types of liquid electrolytes have been investigated so far including organic liquids, ionic liquids, and aqueous. Among them, organic liquid electrolytes are highly flammable and volatile, while aqueous electrolytes suffer from a narrow working voltage window. IL liquid showed a promise to circumvent these challenges, however, their practical applications are plagued by the high cost, difficulty in preparation, and toxicity.This project will develop low-cost …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Chemistry and Physics
Research centre(s)
Centre for Materials Science

High performance energy storage materials and devices

Energy storage devices, such as supercapacitors, play an increasingly important role in our daily life as a reliable energy supplier. Supercapacitors are a type of energy storage system that possess merits of rapid energy storage and release (high power density) with a cycling lifetime of ten thousand or more. Nevertheless the energy density of conventional electrochemical capacitor is quite low.This project aims to enhance the energy density of supercapacitors without compromising their power density through innovative designing and synthesising electrode …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Chemistry and Physics
Research centre(s)
Centre for Materials Science
Centre for Clean Energy Technologies and Practices

Advanced nanomaterials for energy storage and green catalysis

The development of energy conversion and storage devices has been increasingly explored with the primary purpose to address the current energy and environment crisis. One of promising solutions is largely associated with the progress on advanced nanomaterials. These nanomaterials have been verified to exhibit attractive physical and chemical properties and are expected for developing cutting-edge energy conversion and storage devices for supporting a sustainable future. Therefore, the proposed research topics on advanced nanomaterials offers unprecedented opportunities for sustainable energy applications.

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Chemistry and Physics
Research centre(s)
Centre for Materials Science

Metal polymer batteries and supercapacitors for renewable energy storage

Australia boasts rich wind and solar energy resources. To avoid fluctuations placing severe burden on the power grids, a reliable and efficient battery storage is required.The present technology based on lithium-ion batteries suffers from high manufacturing costs, poor safety and short life-span. Metal-polymer batteries are expected to overcome the storage and the charging speed of the traditional batteries in the near future, opening new avenues for renewable energy resources …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Science
School
School of Chemistry and Physics
Research centre(s)
Centre for Materials Science
Centre for Clean Energy Technologies and Practices

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