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Developing a precision oncology workflow for Osteosarcoma treatment

Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common malignant bone tumour that primarily affects children and adolescents. With approximately 400 diagnosed cases/year in Australia, OS has the lowest survival rate of all solid cancers and is the leading cause of cancer-related death in Queensland adolescents. Unfortunately, 3 in 4 patients will not survive longer than five years following diagnosis with metastatic OS. Clinical “one size fits all” treatment strategies results in highly variable and unacceptably poor patient responses. Shockingly, both the OS …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy
Faculty
1043076
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

Development of bioengineered 3D tumour models for preclinical breast cancer research

3D organoid model technologies have led to the development of innovative tools for precision medicine in cancer treatment. Yet, the lack of resemblance to native tumours, and the limited ability to test drugs in a high-throughput mode, has limited translation to practice.This project will progress organoid models by using advanced tissue engineering technologies and high-throughput 3D bioprinting to recreate 'mini-tumours-in-a-dish' from a patient’s own tumour cells, and study the effects of various components of the tumour microenvironment on drug response.In …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
1043076
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

Targeting a novel adaptive neovascular response of the tumour microenvironment to treat advanced prostate cancer

Prostate cancer (PCa) is a significant healthcare burden in Australia. Androgen signalling inhibition using androgen receptor (AR) antagonists is the principal systemic therapy for advanced PCa. Androgen receptors (AR) are an attractive therapeutic target due to their elevated expression in tumour epithelial cells and the retention of androgen signalling throughout the disease continuum.However, patients eventually develop resistance to treatment, and PCa cells metastasise to distant bone and visceral organs, representing an incurable stage of the disease. Understanding mechanisms that contribute …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
1043076
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

Determining the response to PARP inhibitor treatment of ovarian cancer in mouse xenograft model

Our cellular DNA is constantly under threat from both exogenous and endogenous factors. DNA repair pathways function to maintain genomic stability, preventing deleterious mutations that may ultimately lead to cancer initiation. When a tumour forms, it becomes genetically unstable, allowing environmental adaptation. This genetic instability can also result in gene mutations and protein expression alterations that can be targeted to induce cancer-specific cell death (phenomenon also known as synthetic lethality). For example, it has been shown that cells deficient in …

Study level
Honours
Faculty
1043076
School
School of Biomedical Sciences

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