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Found 163 matching student topics

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End of life decision making

Professor Ben White is interested in talking to students who wish to undertake research in the topics of end of life decision making, euthanasia and assisted suicide, withholding and withdrawing life sustaining treatment, advance care planning, adult guardianship or consent to medical treatment.

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy
Faculty
Faculty of Law
School
School of Law
Research centre(s)

Australian Centre for Health Law Research

Specialised medical 3D printing development

Biofabrication is 3D printing applied to medicine. In the Biofabrication and Tissue Morphology Group, our research involves developing 3D printing technology to enable the fabrication of personalised 3D constructs to repair lost or damaged tissue.We design and build specialised 3D printers and electrospinning machines capable of fabricating customised 3D porous structures out of advanced biomaterials for applications in healthcare, medicine and surgery.Learn more about our research at the Biofabrication and Tissue Morphology Group website …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

Mosquito determinants of arbovirus transmission

Project code:QIMR08Area of Research:Infections and ImmunityProject aims and objectives:Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) is a worsening global pandemic resulting from infection with the dengue viruses. The dengue viruses are transmitted through the bite of a mosquito, primarily the highly urbanised and anthropophilic species Aedes aegypti. We have current projects evaluating the vector competence of mosquitoes (capability of virus transmission), a novel anti-viral therapy using dengue Defective Interfering Particles, mosquito immunity and metabolism.Project methodology and resources:The student will participate in …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Renewal and differentiation in human neural stem cells and their application to understanding neurological disorders

The effective regeneration of brain tissue requires an understanding of the factors mediating the damage as well as the integration of new/replacement cells to form new functional neural networks. The isolation and expansion of human stem cells and limited neural lineage differentiation have provided the foundation for strategies in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. We utilise iPSC-derived NPCs and patient-derived (Alzheimer’s disease; AD) iPSCs and neural lineage differentiation of hMSCs, iPSC NPCs and AD iPSCs in neuronal and glial culture …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Characterisation of grass pollen allergen extracts for diagnosis and therapy of patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma

Grass pollen allergens are the major outdoor allergen trigger for allergic asthma and rhinitis (hayfever) that affect up to 20% of Australians as well as 500 million people globally. Our research shows that patients with grass pollen allergy from subtropical regions show sensitisation and specific IgE and T cell recognition of allergens from subtropical grass pollens. Whilst allergen specific immunotherapy vaccine treatments are effective at reducing symptoms of hayfever and reduce progression to asthma, some skin prick test and allergen …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Investigation of genetic factors that contribute to concussion and its outcomes

The health outcomes from traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) and concussion depend on the nature of the injury, but response also varies greatly between individuals, suggesting that genetic factors may play a role. In particular, due to effects of head trauma on balances of ions, neurotransmitters and energy use in the brain, there is suggestion that variation in the genes that encode proteins involved in these pathways, e.g. ion channels, may affect the risk of, as well as response to a …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Using a natural β-carboline dimer compound to target metabolic vulnerabilities linked to glycolysis in prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer is an androgen dependent cancer and treatments are aimed at preventing activation of the androgen receptor. Part of the development of resistance to therapies involves prostate cancers reprogramming their metabolism to overcome metabolic stress induced by these therapies and support growth and survival. This reprogramming involves increases in the rate of glycolysis and intermediate pathways branching from glycolysis. Previously in our laboratory, the natural compound, beta-carboline dimer, BD, was identified to have potent effects on cell viability, cell …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Targeting Fibrosis: Identification of novel natural compounds to modulate collagen expression

Liver disease is a huge and increasing burden on society; it can be due to a number of different reasons including excessive alcohol consumption, viral infections, and non-alcoholic liver disease. Each of these causes may have a different molecular pathway of developing the disease pathology, but one common feature is there is an injury or insult to the liver. This injury then results in activation of the wound healing process; when this healing process goes awry liver disease can develop, …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Role of microRNAs (miRNA) in progression and development of liver disease

Liver disease is a significant burden on society, accounting for more than 2 million deaths worldwide. miRNAs can exert causal roles, being pro- or anti-inflammatory, as well as pro- or antifibrotic mediators or being oncogenes as well as tumour suppressor genes. In this project we will identify novel miRNAs which play a role in the progression and development of liver disease and delineate the mechanisms utilised by these miRNAs using cell and mouse models of disease.Aim 1: To identify differentially …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Developing in vitro 3D models to understand liver disease

Several studies have demonstrated the appropriateness of 3D organoid cultures over the conventional 2D cultures, the advantages of 3D models include replicating the complex attributes of the liver beyond liver-specific metabolism, such as increased cell density, organization, and cell–cell signalling, O2 zonation.In this project we will establish a novel in vitro 3D model to study hepatocyte biology in the context of liver disease. A more comprehensive approach to investigating the intercellular mechanisms of NAFLD will include co-culture of organoids with …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Characterisation of a novel protein co-amplified with the n-MYC oncogene

The MYCN oncogene is amplified in a number of tumour types, including Neuroblastoma (NB) and Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer (NEPC), where it is associated with worse patient prognosis, as compared to non-amplified tumours. However, the high expression of MYCN (encoding the n-MYC protein) alone in non-amplified tumours is associated with better patient prognosis and less aggressive disease. This suggests that other genes co-expressed in MYCN amplified tumours may be responsible for mediating the aggressive traits of n-MYC. Our team has identified …

Study level
Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

Identification and functional characterisation of genetic modifiers of iron overload

Iron is an element essential for virtually all life forms; aberrant iron metabolism is linked to many diseases. These include cancers, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, iron overload and iron deficiency disorders, iron-loading anaemias, and the anaemia associated with chronic disease. Central to proper iron regulation is the appropriate expression and activity of the liver-expressed regulatory peptide, hepcidin, and the iron exporter, ferroportin (FPN). Modulating the expression and activity of hepcidin and FPN, and their interaction is …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)

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