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Water treatment for beef industry

Poor quality water can reduce productivity in the northern beef industry by up to 25%, which reduces the long-term economic sustainability of the industry.QUT has a long history of developing and deploying water treatment technologies at-scale and is seeking a skilled and enthusiastic student to adapt existing technologies or develop new technologies for the beef industry.

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering
Research centre(s)

Ruminant digestion of temperate, sub-tropical, and tropical fodders

The nutritional value of fodder, a type of animal feed, varies depending on the climate in which it is produced (i.e., temperate, sub-tropical, and tropical). The reasons for these differences has not been fully explained.

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Biology and Environmental Science
Research centre(s)

Biological engineering of waste into functional fungal mycelial composites and leather

Numerous residues from agriculture and the urban lifestyle comprise of carbon polymeric chains that are accessible to fungi. Fungi grow on and within these structures and can generate a bound matrix that has notably different properties.This project aims to take a waste material and repurpose it using fungal mycelial mats to penetrate and bind the organic compounds. These can be used directly as packing material or internal building materials.The project will also strive to generate aerial mycelia, which will be …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Biology and Environmental Science
Research centre(s)

Understanding the molecular mechanisms of microbial adaptation to growth on biorefinery feedstocks

Biorefineries are centralised industrial facilities that transform waste and by-products from the crop and animal production sectors into products such as food, energy, and materials. As such, they are central 'pillars' of the circular bioeconomy.Some biorefinery feedstocks are challenging to transform using microorganisms because they contain 'unusual' carbohydrates or a complex mixture of inhibitory compounds.

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Biology and Environmental Science
Research centre(s)

Production of medicinal compounds from mushroom species cultured in solid state fermentation

Australia generates thousands of tonnes of organic waste residues related to agriculture (e.g. sugar and cotton industries). These are generally unsuitable as bacterial growth substrates, but can be utilised by fungi.Fungi have developed an array of enzymes that allow them to access cellular building blocks and energy stored in recalcitrant carbon or ligno-cellulosic/hemi-cellulosic waste material.The aim of this project is to harness the fungi’s ability to access this carbon and generate fungal biomass (mycelia and fruiting bodies) that contain medicinal …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Biology and Environmental Science
Research centre(s)

Microbial colonisation of the insoluble components of low- and high-quality fodder

The nutritional quality of fodders, a type of animal feed, varies widely. It's not clear whether the mechanism by which microorganisms in the rumen break down the fibre in low-quality, medium-quality, and high-quality fodders also varies.

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Biology and Environmental Science
Research centre(s)

Understanding fundamental differences in novel Yarrowia lipolytica strains and their ability to utilise lipid-rich wastewaters

Yarrowia lipolytica is a yeast that is capable of using a host of lipids as a carbon source. The yeast is used for equine and pet food supplements and holds great promise a probiotic and nutritional supplement.We have six unique Australian strains that need to be characterised and compared using various omics platforms. Additionally, growth in various lipid-rich aqueous wastewaters will be compared. Wild type strains will also be genetically altered to develop strains with improved growth and substrate utilisation …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Biology and Environmental Science
Research centre(s)

Investigating the mechanical properties of temperate, subtropical, and tropical fodder

There is strong, qualitative evidence that fodder crops produced in the tropics are 'tougher' and less nutritious than fodder crops produced in subtropical and temperate regions.However, tools that can quantify the mechanical properties of fodder crops, particularly those with direct relevance to feeding and nutrition, are lacking.

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours, Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Science and Engineering Faculty
School
School of Biology and Environmental Science
Research centre(s)

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