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Development of methods to analyse cells in 3D bioengineered human tumour models

Over the past few decades, cancer mortality has risen more than 2.6-folds in Australia, mandating novel research to study and understand the mechanisms of cancer biology. Recent advancements in technology have led to development of novel scaffold-based, bioengineered 3D tumour models that recapitulate the complex, in vivo cancer microenvironment better than the conventional 2D monolayer cultures.Specifically, tumour cells encapsulated in hydrogel systems are widely used as effective 3D tumour models because of how closely they mimic the native tissue extracellular …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

Development of 3D tumour models for radiobiological research

Approximately 40 percent of cancer patients will receive radiation therapy as part of the management of their disease. Radiation can be used alone or in combination with other treatment modalities such as surgery, chemotherapy, and increasingly immunotherapy.Optimising the delivery of radiation, to take advantage of new treatment planning and delivery techniques, or to test new combinations of treatment modalities in a pre-clinical setting, has traditionally been performed using single layer 2D cell cultures and small animal models.Recently, it has become …

Study level
Vacation research experience scheme
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
School
School of Mechanical, Medical and Process Engineering
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

Development of bioengineered 3D tumour models for preclinical breast cancer research

3D organoid model technologies have led to the development of innovative tools for precision medicine in cancer treatment. Yet, the lack of resemblance to native tumours, and the limited ability to test drugs in a high-throughput mode, has limited translation to practice.This project will progress organoid models by using advanced tissue engineering technologies and high-throughput 3D bioprinting to recreate 'mini-tumours-in-a-dish' from a patient’s own tumour cells, and study the effects of various components of the tumour microenvironment on drug response.In …

Study level
PhD, Master of Philosophy, Honours
Faculty
Faculty of Health
School
School of Biomedical Sciences
Research centre(s)
Centre for Biomedical Technologies

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