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QUT Teacher Podclass

A podcast series that’s all about supporting and inspiring teachers, hosted by award-winning journalist Madonna King.

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Welcome to QUT Teacher Podclass

Teacher Podclass is a fascinating seven-part interview series hosted by Madonna King. In this trailer we’ve condensed hours of chats down to a couple of minutes so you can get a quick overview of the topics and a sense of just how Teacher Podclass could have a positive impact on the lives of everyone who is passionate about teaching.

Taking leadership in your stride

Principals aren’t the only leaders in our schools. Teachers have the communication and collaboration skills that are the foundation of effective leadership. Our students can be leaders too, and their ability to listen, to solve problems within a group and empathise with others can be encouraged at a very young age. Listen as Associate Professor Sue Irvine explains just what it means to be a leader, and how we can all embrace leadership roles with confidence.

Show notes

View transcript

Interview with

Associate Professor Sue Irvine

Book recommendation

Jumping ship by Michael Trail. Making visible the impact of strategic and ethical leadership in all contexts, in particular, education and not for-profit social ventures.

Recent research

Professionalism, paperwork and pedagogy: Identifying leadership strategies that enable professional practice in long day care. Funded by the Department of Education, Education Horizon Grant Scheme (2017 – 2018).

Free webinar

Early Childhood Australia Learning Hub

Learn more

QUT offers professional development and postgraduate study opportunities to help you take your teaching to the next level.

Thinking outside the classroom

Dr Bronwyn Ewing loves maths, but she knows not everybody feels the same way. That’s why she’s devoted herself to encouraging positive engagement with maths through contextualised learning. Hear how using everything from turtle eggs to cemetery headstones can give maths a real-world context and get students of all ages engaged and participating in learning.

Show notes

View transcript

Interview with

Dr Bronwyn Ewing

Connect with Dr Ewing through Twitter and LinkedIn.

Big ideas in this episode

Visualise: The importance of visualising for the brain and learning. Our brains want to think visually about mathematics so we need to provide contexts and opportunities for learners to visually think and represent their mathematics ideas.

Contexts —the curriculum beyond the classroom: Opening up contexts for maths learners provides opportunities for them see mathematical ideas in different ways and invites students to see maths differently, explore ideas and ask their own questions.

Investigate: provide learning opportunities that are low floor high-ceiling tasks that provide the best conditions for engaging all students and whatever knowledge and experiences they bring to the classroom context.

Talks: Amazing things happen when students make sense of their maths learning in their own ways and provide convincing arguments and build on the ideas of their peers and the teacher.  Talking about maths can excite learners as they dig deeper into why mathematical processes work.

References

Ewing, Bronwyn F. (2010) YuMi Deadly Maths: Diagnostic Assessment Measurement: Prep to Year 6. Tagai Maths for Employment: Interview Diagnostic Assessment Prep to Year 6.

Boaler, J. (2016). Mathematics mindsets: Unleashing students’ potential through creative maths, inspiring messages and innovative teaching. Jossey-Bass: San Francisco.

Humphreys C., & Parker R. (2015). Making number talks matter: Developing mathematical practices and deepening understanding, Grades 3-10. Stenhouse Publishers: United States of America.

Learn more

QUT offers professional development and postgraduate study opportunities to help you take your teaching to the next level.

Honouring your health and wellbeing

Teachers are often so dedicated to helping others, they can fail to recognise that their own wellbeing is at risk. In this podcast Dr Rebecca Spooner-Lane points out some of the early signs of burnout. She also talks about simple steps teachers can take to look after themselves.

Show notes

View transcript

Interview with

Dr Rebecca Spooner-Lane

Connect with Dr Spooner-Lane through Twitter and LinkedIn.

About potential stresses

Research has shown that there are clear and particular signs of stress or teacher burnout. It’s how you deal with them that matters. Rebecca Spooner-Lane’s research nominates these:

  • Irritability with students
  • Avoiding responsibility
  • Working harder and getting less done
  • Feeling discouraged or indifferent
  • Decreased interest in teaching
  • Showing resistance to change
  • Feeling a sense of failure
  • Avoiding discussions
  • Postponing meetings
  • Higher than normal absenteeism
  • Inability to concentrate

More professional learning

The beginning teacher’s field guide: embarking on your first year by Tina Boogren (2018).

The teacher's ultimate stress mastery guide: 77 Proven Prescriptions to Build Your Resilience by Jack Singer (2012).

Podcast: Teacher Well-being with Ellen Ronalds Keene.

BRITE (Building Resilience in Teacher Education) Program: www.brite.edu.au

Self-care for Teachers by Ellen Rolands Keene: www.selfcareforteachers.com.au

Learn more

QUT offers professional development and postgraduate study opportunities to help you take your teaching to the next level.

Who’s your classroom buddy?

Dr Rebecca Spooner-Lane discusses why having a mentor can be an effective way to boost  wellbeing. Rebecca talks about her own experience with mentors, good and not so good. Plus, she gives us tips on how to find the mentor that’s right for you.

Show notes

View transcript

Interview with

Dr Rebecca Spooner-Lane

Connect with Dr Spooner-Lane through Twitter and LinkedIn.

Mentoring Beginning Teachers

Find out more about QUT's Mentoring Beginning Teachers workshop.

Learn more

QUT offers professional development and postgraduate study opportunities to help you take your teaching to the next level.

Dear guidance counsellor

Where should teachers go to for career support and guidance? Professor Donna King believes there are lots of avenues to pursue, including talking to a guidance counsellor. Donna is also a big believer in the value of planning. Listen to her own journey from straight-A  student to teaching and on to a special role at QUT where she now leads the people inspiring our future teachers.

Show notes

View transcript

Interview with

Professor Donna King

Connect with Professor King through LinkedIn.

Top five tips for goal setting

  1. Write down your goals: 3 month, 6 month, 12 month, 3 years, 5 years
  2. Research and seek information about an interest/ new direction from someone you admire
  3. Talk to your manager about your career goals and set clear steps towards achieving them
  4. Review how you are going each month and revise the goals
  5. It’s OK to change your mind and direction. Opportunities will appear that take you down new paths.

Book recommendation

Teacher Effectiveness Training by Thomas Gordon

Learn more

QUT offers professional development and postgraduate study opportunities to help you take your teaching to the next level.

Is inspiration just a tweet away?

Teachers love finding fresh ideas to bring into the classroom. But where should they look for them? Dr Kay Oddone says you can unearth gems of inspiration from the other side of the planet. You just need to know how to get the best out of social media. Listen to Kay as she explains the value of a Professional Learning Network (PLN) and talks you through how to create one of your own.

Show notes

View transcript

Interview with

Dr Kay Oddone

Connect with Dr Oddone through Twitter and LinkedIn.

Kay's non-fiction picks

  • 21 Lessons for the 21st Century by Yuval Noah Harari
  • Steal like an artist by Austin Kleon

A book for teachers

The Innovators’ Mindset by George Couros

Developing a PLN

A practical guide to setting up your own Professional Learning Network - www.linkinglearning.com.au/develop-your-pln

Blogs and blogging

How to create your own space online - www.linkinglearning.com.au/blogs-and-blogging

Learn more

QUT offers professional development and postgraduate study opportunities to help you take your teaching to the next level.

Start the day with a song

If self-regulation skills are the foundation of effective learning, how do we build them? Dr Kate Williams believes the answer can be found in music. In this episode she explains how dancing, singing and playing musical instruments at the start of a school day can get young minds in tune with the first lesson. Don’t have any instruments? Don’t worry. Kate believes clapping, chanting and drumming with pencils can do wonders.

Show notes

View transcript

Interview with

Dr Kate Williams

Connect with Dr Williams through Twitter, LinkedIn or visit her website.

Concrete Steps to help children self-regulate

  1. Body Percussion
    Use music and simple body percussion as a learning warm up at the start of the day.
  2. Learning Goals
    Focussed on self-regulation – focussing on organisation.
  3. Using language around Self-Regulation
    Giving children the language to describe their emotions and giving children the strategies, they can use when anxious or frustrated.

Learn more

QUT offers professional development and postgraduate study opportunities to help you take your teaching to the next level.