Education

News

25 October 2018

It can be easy for teachers to put the needs of the young people they work with ahead of their own. As the school year draws to a close, it’s worthwhile for teachers and educators to reflect on their own well-being in the workplace. So what can individual teachers do help maintain their mental health and well-being?

Dr Rebecca Spooner-Lane is an academic, educator and psychologist at QUT’s Faculty of Education. Her research aims to understand the factors that inform teacher well-being and develop strategies that support teacher resilience.

Rebecca said it’s important for teachers to be proactive when it comes to managing their health and well-being.

“Teachers expend a huge amount of energy and time investing in student learning. Each day can bring unpredictable and new demands,” said Rebecca.

“In Australia, the education sector ranks number two for mental health stress claims. It’s one of the main reasons why teachers leave the profession.”

“When work stress is experienced over a long period of time, individuals’ mental health and well-being are negatively impacted.”

“Furthermore, students’ learning outcomes can also be affected if a teacher is unable to perform in their jobs to the best of their ability.”

In order to keep teachers in the profession, Rebecca said that teachers must develop the skills needed to manage stress.

In her professional development workshop on Friday 23 November, Keeping in the profession: self-care for teachers, Rebecca will share practical strategies and techniques informed by psychological research that will help teachers improve their well-being.

“In the workshop, participants will be given an opportunity to explore what triggers their stress, their personal values and beliefs about self-care, and their behaviour towards self-care.”

“They will develop an achievable personal well-being plan and start the process of making real life changes.”

“They’ll also have the opportunity to learn a range of effective coping skills including breathing, meditation, and mindfulness techniques, as well as recognising and challenging unhelpful beliefs.”

While organisations and school leaders play an important role in developing supportive workplace practices and environments, Rebecca encouraged individual teachers to take action where they can.

“I think it’s important for all teachers to be proactive when it comes to managing their health and well-being,” said Rebecca.

“By the end of the workshop, participants will feel rejuvenated, empowered and in control of their health and well-being.”

Find out more or register for the workshop Keeping in the profession: self-care for teachers on Friday 23 November. Participants who complete the workshop will be issued a certificate of attainment for six hours of CPD.

Learn more about the Faculty of Education’s professional development opportunities for educators

Dr Rebecca Spooner-Lane is an academic, educator and psychologist at QUT’s Faculty of Education. In her new workshop, Rebecca will share practical strategies and techniques informed by psychological research to help teachers maintain their well-being.

QUT's new workshop on Friday 23 November will help teachers and educators maintain their workplace health and well-being.

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