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  • Professor Zee Upton is heading to the world's largest biotechnology convention, 2012 BIO, to describe how VitroGro® ECM, a revolutionary wound-healing treatment, was invented.

QUT wound healing invention stars at 2012 BIO

12 June 2012

A revolutionary wound-healing treatment developed at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) will be showcased at the world's largest biotechnology convention 2012 BIO in Boston this month.

The product, VitroGro® ECM, has produced remarkable results in human trials to date and will be launched into the European market later this year.

VitroGro® ECM inventor, Professor Zee Upton along with Tissue Therapies CEO Dr Steve Mercer will describe the product's invention and development at a 2012 BIO session on June 21.

Professor Zee Upton said that VitroGro® ECM is applied directly on to complex difficult to heal wounds creating a favourable environment for healing.

2012 BIO will be attended by about 15,000 delegates from at least 60 countries.

The Wound Management CRC secured the breakout session which centre CEO Professor Stephen Prowse describes as a real coup.

"Sessions are very competitive and it is rare that an Australian research organisation gets an opportunity to showcase Australian biotechnology at this annual international convention," he said.

The session will be Chaired by Dr Peter Riddles, the Chair of the Wound CRC Board and also involve presentations from Dr Tom Serena and Professor Alan Widgerow, both whom have extensive experience in wound healing and regenerative medicine.

Dr Tom Serena will conduct a further clinical trial of VitroGro® ECM for the treatment of chronic venous ulcers in the USA starting late 2012. The clinical sites involved in this trial will principally be within the United States.

Chronic wounds present a huge challenge to health care systems costing nearly three per cent of national health-care spend and affecting two percent of the population.

"Ulcers and other chronic wounds can take a long time to heal and are debilitating and painful for patients," said Professor Prowse.

"With our aging population and increases in diseases such as diabetes, the number of chronic wounds is set to increase, too."

Media contact: Rose Trapnell, QUT media officer, 07 3138 2361 or 0407 585 901 rose.trapnell@qut.edu.au